Top 10 Tips For Helping Your Kids Avoid Online Porn

Today’s guest post–on a very important topic, is by Dr Todd Curtis!

It is no secret that there is plenty of pornography and other inappropriate content online, and if your child is online then there is always a risk of being exposed to such material, whether by accident, by someone else’s actions, or because of the actions of your child

There is plenty that parents and other responsible adults can do to protect children from exposure to explicit sexual material and other inappropriate online content. The following tips are a good first step toward keeping children away from this kind of potentially disturbing material.

1. Your family should have very clear rules about what is allowed and what is not allowed: It helps if these rules are written down in the form of a family Internet use agreement.

2. Your family rules should apply at home and away from home: While schools and libraries often design their systems to limit access to many kinds of web sites, there may not be any content limits on the computers of friends or relatives.

3. Inappropriate content may be sent to a family member or a family member may look for it: It could come by email, instant message, or text message.

4. Anyone can accidentally encounter inappropriate content online or in an email: Anyone who has an email address can receive unsolicited email that may include sexually explicit material or links to such material. Email filters may stop most of these emails, but no filter can stop them all.

5. Be very careful when using search engines: Sometimes a search using a completely innocent word or phrase could generate one or more links to adult material, and sometimes you don’t know it until you click on the link. You may want keep a younger child from using search engines unless the search engine is filtered or if the child is supervised while doing a search.

6. You can use filters on your home computer to limit the kind of content that can be displayed: There are many commercially available software programs that can filter or block certain types of content or web sites. Also, you may be able to configure your operating system or browser to limit the kinds of content that are allowed.

7. You may also be able to use a filter in an online service such as a search engine: The major search engines all have filtering options to limit the kind of content that it will show.

8. Inappropriate content can be in an email, on a web site, on a hard drive, or stored offline: This kind of content does not have to come from the Internet. Flash drives, CD-ROMs, and other portable storage devices are capable of containing all the types of sexually explicit material that is available online.

9. Inappropriate content can be in any kind of file format: This content often is in the form of a picture, but it could also be an audio file, video file, or plain text.

10. Evidence of inappropriate activities can be in a browser’s history or cookie file, in an online account, on a hard drive, or stored offline: You should learn how to review your browser’s history and cookie file to see if there is any unusual activity. You should also keep track of the CD-ROMs, flash drives, and other portable storage devices that your family may use.

How much time and energy you will have to invest to keep pornography and other inappropriate material from your children will depend on your child and on your family’s situation. Because this kind of material is very prevalent online, the kind of risks that your children will face will change over time.

An additional resource that may help you manage what you family does online is the Family Forms Pack from Speedbrake Publishing. This downloadable document at http://forms.speedbrake.com/ contains several forms that you can print out and use to help manage your family’s online activities. Included are sample family Internet use agreements, a form to record the locations of flash drives and other portable data storage devices, and a form that you can use to record user names and passwords.

About the Author: Dr. Todd Curtis is the creator of the web’s most popular airline safety site AirSafe.com (http://www.airsafe.com), the director of the AirSafe.com Foundation, and an expert in the areas of engineering risk assessment and risk management. He has applied those basic principles to the problem of managing Internet use, and has put many of those insights and lessons learned into his book Parenting and the Internet (Speedbrake Publishing, 2007), an easy to understand how-to guide that parents can use to manage the activities of their online children. For more information about the book and how it can help you, visit http://books.speedbrake.com

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  • http://www.aweekinthelifeofaredhead.com A Week In The Life of A Redhead

    I don’t know, some TV commercials could be peddled as Soft Porn. I am amazed at what comes on during Prime Time that uses sex to sell … without time for me to change the channel. Internet Porn seems more honest – at least you see it coming and know the message.
    Catherine, the redhead blogger

  • kookimebux

    Hello. And Bye. :)

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