6 Unique Strategies for Divorced Families

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I have posted about tips for divorced families before because it is a subject that is near and dear to my heart. My parents divorced when I was 4 and I switched houses every Monday until I was 17…so I am always trying to think of things I wish my parents had done to help out families going through this rough period.

1. Define Family
I think I freaked out because I thought that I would never have a real family again. One of the first things I hope you can do with your children…is to explain that a family with one dad, lesbian moms, three half-sisters, single parents, step parents…they are all different types of families. Think about what family means to you and explain this to your kids, let them know that there are many different kinds of families and there is no better, best or ‘normal’—only happy and loving.

2. New Start…New Rules
Make the rules before they make you! Take the chance for a new start and have everyone decide what kind of new house rules you want to have. I always felt really empowered when my parents asked me my opinion on new household routines or rules. Be sure to also make a new emergency routine (emergency numbers, what to do in a new house in case of fire or earthquake…often overlooked, but very important). I was terrified for my other house during the LA earthquake and for a while phone lines were down so we couldn’t call each other…always know what to do.

3. New Start…Same Ethics
New rules are great, but sometimes we like to take advantage or our parents chaos to assume punching your brother, stealing candy and cursing like dad are suddenly ok. Be sure to let them know, that although there are a lot of changes, your family values and ethics are still the same.

4. Being Scared is OK
Be open, let them know you are scared too, and it might take a little while, but you can work together to make things feel ok.

5. Mum’s the Word
My parents are extremely good about not talking about the other. I mean literally avoid any comments at all in front of your kids, when you say bad things it can be upsetting and even when you say good things it can be confusing (i.e why don’t you just get back together?)

6. Find Other Single Parents
As I mentioned in a previous post, my mom just joined Jdate…she is much happier when she goes out. Find other single and divorced parents, I am sure they have far better tips than I!

7. Maintain Habit and Approach
Don’t keep switching tactics. I think a lot of divorced parents are so desperate to make their kids feel ok they try everything and anything…incentives, rewards, punishment, presents, denial, upset. Pick a strategy and stick to it. The more consistent we see you being, the easier it is for us to find our footing. Be patient with us, show us love, we will come around = ).

I am now putting together a post on the best resources for divorced and single parents. Please submit your additions to this article in the comments and any other books, resources, websites, blogs etc, you want me to review for the post!

*Image Courtesy of Joe-ks.com

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  • http://www.mindoh.wordpress.com Amy Strecker

    As a kid of divorced parents, I think these are great suggestions. I would add to the list having age appropriate conversations with you children about the reason for the divorce as well. This isn’t to say air your ex’s dirty laundry and place blame — but kids need to understand the reasons behind this radical shift of lifestyle and that they aren’t at fault. Both parents probably need to agree on the reasons being presented to the kid(s).

    My parents divorced when I was in the 5th grade, and my mom and I have had ongoing conversations about my parents’ relationship. I now understand the failures there on a much deeper level than when I was 11, and I’m able to take their experience, learn from it, and hopefully avoid the same mistake in my own life.

  • Pingback: 6 Strategies for Divorced Families (+ 1) « The MindOH! Blog

  • http://vanessavanpetten.com Vanessa

    Amy
    Thanks for your addition, I completely agree!~

    Vanessa

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