“Raves – What Parents and Teens Need to Know”

Danielle is an 18-year-old teenager from Placentia, CA. She is passionate about music and writing. When she is not writing essays and articles, she is busy making music, studying, and hanging out at her favorite spots in the OC.

Since 2008 the growing popularity with the “rave scene” has picked up immensely among teens as young as 13. Electronic Dance Music
Festivals, better known as raves, have become a very dangerous place for young teens. Raves are for people to discover new music and connect with world class DJs.

Since the death of 15-year-old Sasha Rodriguez, who died of a drug overdose on ecstasy while attending the 2-day rave Electronic Daisy Carnival, the media has the rave scene under a microscope. The rave that Rodriguez attended was 16+, but somehow she easily found a way around the age limitation. Most raves used to welcome “all responsible ages” but since Rodriguez’s death, most events are restricted to 18+. However that doesn’t stop a lot of underage teens from using fake Ids. I’ve asked a few fellow “ravers” their opinion on taking these dangerous drugs at raves and their responses all led me to the conclusion that teens believe going out and experimenting with these drugs is harmless and fun. They don’t care about the game of risk they are playing with their lives probably because they are simply uneducated about the rave scene.

So here’s the question: Are teens responsible enough to attend raves? I believe so and with the right knowledge, not only can raves be safe for teens again, but also it will clean up the rave scene as well and reinstate “PLUR”. Let’s face it, teens are teens and we’re going to do what we want to do regardless. We teens always seem to find a way to get what we want if we want it bad enough. So parents, here’s a list of things that you should go over with your teens if you know they attend these events:

PARENTS – Talk to your teens about the dangers of experimenting with drugs and accepting substances from strangers, which includes even water. It is very common for someone to ask for a sip of a stranger’s water. A lot of times, people put drugs in their own water. It is not unusual. Educate your teen about the common substances handed out at raves: Ecstasy, LSD, Ketamine, etc.
– Make sure you know the venue and type of area the rave is being held at. Certain areas, especially in LA, are dangerous at 4am; which is usually when raves end.

– Some raves are “underground” which is extremely dangerous because it is off the radar. That means no security, no ambulances, and more drug trafficking.

TEENS – Yes, a lot of people are doing it but not everyone is doing it. Don’t use the excuse, oh that’ll never happen to me. I bet Sasha Rodriguez thought the same thing but you know what, its can happen to anyone. Don’t let that person be you. One night of “fun” is not
worth your life.
– For teen (girls), dressing up in almost nothing is dangerous and is pretty much “asking for it”. I know its fun to dress up but have some dignity. Having your junk hanging out all over the place is tacky and you’re giving the sexual predators out there exactly what they want. You’re making yourself vulnerable.
– Stay hydrated! Especially if you ignore this entire article (and your parents) and decide to experiment with drugs. It is really easy to pass out due to dehydration when on these substances and it is extremely important to drink a lot of water. I know a few people who have been rushed to the hospital due to dehydration at raves.
– Don’t accept rides home with anyone you didn’t know before the event. NO EXCEPTIONS! It doesn’t matter if your ride left you; call your parents or a friend. A lot of people may seem nice and offer you a ride home because they “live close to your area”. No matter how
nice they have been or how long you were with them throughout the night, you don’t know them.

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