Jersey Shore: High School Edition

A writer, hopeless romantic, and lover of all foods, Kimberlie is a seventeen year old living in Arizona. Her mind consists of a million chambers always pondering the what’s and why’s of life, and she considers herself anything but simple. She loves having long conversations with friends over the goodness that is a cup of chai tea latte.

 

high school, senior, spirit week, clothes, Jersey ShoreTo say I was disappointed when Student Government announced the theme for our spring spirit week would be an understatement. As a senior, this would be the last spirit week I would ever be able to participate in. I would miss the days of combing the racks of Savers or having my own edition of Project Runway. Our theme: TV Land. And for seniors, they allotted us the ‘special’ Wednesday theme of Reality TV—in other words, Jersey Shore.

I began to have a premonition.

I saw spray tans, muscle shirts, short dresses, high heels, and fuzzy slippers. Amidst my halls I could imagine a hoard of girls that looked ready to go to the club, and not English class. Why was my school promoting this show, a show that thrives on the entertainment found in excessive drinking, partying, and sexual activities?

I shuddered, and made a personal vow not to participate on Wednesday.

I lay in wait for Wednesday to come, and on the morning of this dreaded day, I put on my sweatpants and t-shirt, and thought it was my best form of rebellion.

And here’s the rundown of it all…

The first girl I saw had stuffed a pillow in her shirt pretending to be pregnant.

As I braced for more obscenities, I came to an unfortunate realization…I could hardly tell if they were dressing up, or simply wearing their everyday clothes.

Yes, I saw mini dresses, spray tans, and overly hair-sprayed hair, but I see that EVERYDAY.

It was eye-opening to realize that I wasn’t shocked by the scandalous attire. I had accumulated immunity from every other day of the school year that I saw the exact same thing.

I know it’s a battle to control what your teen wears to school. I can personally say from a firsthand account that I sometimes have this struggle with my parents as well. However, when I saw my peers, I came to a realization that what you wear is a representation of who you are. And we can say that we shouldn’t judge a book by its cover, but sometimes it’s a pretty accurate depiction.

I now give a second thought to what my parents have to say about my clothes, and what my choice of attire says about me.

Parents, to get through to your teen, simply ask them what they want others to see based off first impressions, because first impressions matter. It’s the difference between getting the job interview or the audition or being turned away—then dress to exude this persona, and not for any other reason.

 

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