7 Strategies for Highly Successful Teens

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A life changing program for your teens.

I am so excited to announce I have a new program for Teens, Parents and Teachers.

In this fun, entertaining and inspirational talk I go over the 7 strategies for highly effective teens.

This is nothing like your typical high school presentation.

Here are some highlights:

  • Groundbreaking research insights about the teen brain and behavior
  • Hilarious and inspiring videos
  • Immediately applicable action steps to motivate and encourage teens from all levels
  • Relatable stories for teens to feel engaged and understood

I can’t give too much away, but in this talk we delve into both the lighthearted and serious issues teens face including:

  • Effective communication with peers, parents and teachers
  • Mastering the online environment–preventing cyberbullying, staying savvy online and building a digital reputation that lasts
  • School – life balance, reducing stress and finding the right outlets
  • How to have healthy relationships with the important people in a teen’s life
  • Planning for the future, smart college applications, resume building and finding your life passions

I am stoked about this new talk and have already booked out January, February and March at High Schools, youth conferences and Parent groups around the US.

Please contact our manager Lynn Campbell for pricing and date availability:

 manager@radicalparenting.com

*Yes, of course, we have a tween version!

5 Best Parenting Books

What are the 5 parenting books that every parent should read? It is a mission at Radical Parenting to increase reading and literacy. We also love supporting authors.

Here we have selected our top five favorite books for parents:

top picks for parents, mom blog, recommendations for parents, website for parents, parenting website
All of our content is Teen Approved by our teen interns!

NurtureShock: New Thinking About Children by Po Bronson and Ashley Merryman

This is an amazing book for parents that uses scientific studies to bust parenting myths and help give tools that actually work.

Scream Free Parenting by Jenny Runkel

ScreamFree Parenting is a new approach to parenting that parents rave about. The focus is on creating responsible, caring adults through improving your relationship with your child rather than just trying to “get them” to do the right thing. It contains universal principles, which teach parents to become the calm, cool, and connected influencers in their homes rather than trying to simply be game wardens or gate keepers.

Sacred Parenting: How Raising Children Shapes our Souls by Gary L. Thomas

Sacred Parenting is unlike any other parenting book you have ever read. This is not a “how-to” book that teaches you ways to discipline your kids or help them achieve their full potential. Instead of discussing how parents can change their kids, Sacred Parenting turns the tables and demonstrates how God uses our kids to change us.

Real Love and Real Love in Parenting by Greg Baer, M.D.

Greg Baer holds nothing back. Some of what he says might feel a little harsh, but can be a real wake up call to be REAL about our responsibilities and our role in our kids’ lives. Tweens and Teens of parents applying these principles will love the change they see in their parents and how they feel happier, receive more respect, autonomy, and skills to prepare them for a lifetime of powerfully REAL relationships and happiness.

Just Tell Me What To Say: Sensible Tips and Scripts For Perplexed Parents by Betsy Brown Braun

This book provides hands-on, just give-it-to-me-straight tools so that parents gain the skills and confidence they need to handle the sometimes challenging situations that inevitably accompany raising children ages 2-6 and beyond. Hailed by the New York Times as a “parenting guru,” Braun’s down-to-earth advice is derived from her expertise working with thousands of children (from toddlers to teens) and parents for over three decades.

We hope you will consider bringing more books into your own home. Feel free to leave us your favorite books in the comments.

If you liked this post, you might also like our list of favorite books for parents at Radical Parenting.

An Encouraging Letter to American Parents

Advice for Parenting Teenagers: Help for A Teenage Break-UpThis article is by our resident school counselor at Radical Parenting. Check out her bio and other articles or submit a question at School Counselor’s Corner: Q&A with Dr. A.  

Is anyone else sick of hearing about what terrible parents we are?  How American children are poorly behaved, sugar-induced, self-serving, lost individuals, with little drive to do right?  With Chinese “tiger moms,” Finland’s high achievers, and superior French discipline all the rage in the media this past year, it’s a wonder our children manage to get their shoes on the right feet.  According to pop culture, Western parents should be ashamed of themselves.  We are obviously gluttonous, rude, lazy pushovers raising similar children, right?

Well, I am here to stand up for the American parent.  I am a psychologist, parent of 3, and work at an amazing school with children and their parents daily.  My opinion may not matter to many, but for what it’s worth, these are my observations about our above average American families.

American parents work hard.  We work hard at work, we work hard at home, and sometimes we work just so that our children can have the best.  And while sometimes that equates to material items, more often than not, our intention is to give them the best of opportunity.  We want our children to be pushed to their potential, but not over the edge; academically, socially, and spiritually.  We work so that our children can find inspiration and passion in experiences that you and I never dreamed of having at their ages.  All this while trying not to overschedule, maintain reasonable nutritional habits, and keep our family’s quality time intact despite their extracurricular activities.  We are incredibly involved, including the ever-neglected father, in the lives of our children and in the role modeling for our children.

We are good people trying to do right by our children and the world. We teach them good character and the importance of doing the right thing.  We teach them traits like integrity, generosity, and open-mindedness.  In a world where terrorism is all too real and frightening, we shield our children from the horror and try to convince them that the world is a good, kind place (but wear your seatbelt and don’t talk to strangers).  We teach them if we just practice tolerance and understanding, we can all get along and work together for a greater nation and a greater world.  We teach our kids to take care of the Earth and all that she grants us so that their children, our grandchildren, will get to a chance to grow up in a healthier environment.

Lastly, we teach them gratitude.  For all that we work for and give them, we want them to know that they are the lucky ones.  They are afforded opportunities and experiences only because of our sacrifices, but we can’t choose their destiny.  Their ultimate success will lie in their own hands and only with hard work, perseverance, and determination will they reach their own goals.  We will do anything and everything to give them the tools they need, but we can’t force them to use these gifts.

It is this kind of parenting, my friends, that has shaped our country.  Last I heard, the United States of America is still pretty well recognized as an internationally superpower, so we can’t be doing that badly.  Someone raised and educated our leaders and I’m pretty certain they were American parents.  So, while each country and generation degrades the next about how spoiled our children are, let them talk. The rest of us will continue to overindulge them with love, education, acceptance, and the capacity to think outside the box; to solve problems we don’t even know exist yet.  All I can say is that from my view, these kids aren’t doing so badly and consequently, maybe, just maybe, we deserve a small pat on the back.

This thought was confirmed as I sat listening to our valedictorian and salutatorian’s speeches at this year’s graduation.  They were emitting advice about not just following your dreams, but taking your dreams a step further and choosing to make an impact in this world; pushing themselves to choose greatness and in turn, making a positive change for the universe. Their words to each other are to reach for greatness and improve upon the life we have granted them.  Could it get any better?  I could not help but think, “Thank God for these kids.”  With all that we have worked to give them; they get it and they will do great things with it.  It is true that they are spoiled with opportunity and they are all the better for it.  These children are truly our future and unlike most people’s perspectives, this gives me great peace of mind.

So, hold fast American parents.  Here’s your “Attaboy!”  I know you are wondering if the sleepless nights rocking your infant, finishing that last minute project with your child, and worrying about your teenager’s whereabouts are worth it, but if these kids are any indication of our energy and efforts, the answer is clear.  Dig in, dig deep, and keep doing what your doing and take solace in knowing that we’re in this together.

15 Best Books for Young Adults and Tweens

books for kids, best books, best books for teens, summer reading, book recommendations for teens
These books are Teen Approved by our teen interns!

Finding good young adult books is a challenge–but getting the right book can encourage young readers and make for great reading escapes. Here at Radical Parenting we want to review some of the best books for young adults and tween readers. We try to pick the best three in each category.

Why is it so important for young adults to read?

We love encouraging young adult readers and tween readers because we think books are the way to teach kids life lessons and provide a safe brain stimulating activity. Here are some other reasons to get the tween in your life a life-changing book:

  1. Tweens Learn Best From Stories: Young adult readers love to learn from characters in their books. Some of the best books out there (including the ones we chose below) have amazing moral lessons, life lessons and characters young adult readers can look up to. As tweens read they are able to put themselves in the shoes of the character and decide how they would make decisions. This is a great mental lesson.
  2. A Safe Activity for Young Adults: As long as the book is appropriate, I can’t quite think of a safer activity for young adults other than reading. During summer breaks or weekends, there is nothing better than helping a tween dive into a great book.
  3. Awesome Books Inspire Awesome Thinking: Books encourage imagination and brain stimulation far more than movies or Facebook. When a tween or young adult picks up a good book their creative juices flow and their imagination is active.

Top Books for Young Adult ReadersBest Books For Young Adults and Tweens

We always choose the best three books in a category and then have our favorites in each category, teen pick and runner ups below. Be sure to leave your favorites in the comments or if you have reviews on our best books for teens.

1. Wings of Fire by Tui T. Sutherland

This is a wonderful book series for tweens and young adults. It is full of adventure and magic and works for both boy tweens and girl tweens as summer or fun reading. This book is great for young adults because it is the story of dragons and will entice lots of imagination and adventure.

2. Criss Cross by Lynne Rae Perkins

This is a lovely and inspiring story for your young adult reader. Debbie is the main character of the story who takes readers along with her on her journey. This is for ages 10 and up and has won a Newbery award as well as the hearts of may tween readers.

3. Hope Was Here by Joan Bauer 

Hope Was Here is a story of a young girl in a small town. The touching tale will bring out the sappy in any reader. Another Newbery Honor book, tweens will feel inspired and take home lessons from Joan Bauer’s story of a young girl from Wisconsin.

Fiction Books for Young Adult ReadersBest Fiction Books for Young Adults and Tweens

If your tween is looking for an escape, these best fiction books are the way to go. The stories are fun and relatable and your young adult reader will love them.

1. Harry Potter Series by J.K. Rowling

Of course, we had to list Harry Potter as one of the best series of all time. Be careful, your tween reader will get totally hooked to these books and you might not be able to pry them out of their hands! These are also great books to listen to on tape with tweens or kids in the car on road trips and vacations.

2.  The Best School Year Ever by Barbara Robinson

This is a funny book of stories about misfits and all of their adventures. If you have a reader with a short attention span or a spunky attitude then this book by Barbara Robinson is for your young adult reader!

3. The Last Book In The Universe by Rodman Philbrick

This interesting book is set in the future and helps to get tween and young adult readers thinking about some bigger questions. What could happen in the future? How do we view reading? How do we value books? Great for both male and female readers The Last Book in the Universe is a great summer read.

Best Non-Fiction Self-Help Books for Young Adults and Tweens

Some tweens are looking for inspiration from their books. These non-fiction picks or self-help books for tweens can teach and inspire.

Non-Fiction Books for Tweens1. Chicken Soup for the Kid’s Soul by Jack Canfield, Mark Victor Hansen, Patty Hansen, Irene Dunlap

The Chicken Soup series are classics that will always resonate with readers–no matter what age. What I love about the Chicken Soup series is it uses real stories to inspire and teach lessons to kids and tweens.

2. Young Revolutionaries Who Rock by Dallas Jessup

This is a great “How-To Guide for Saving the World One Revolution at a Time” and sets out to inspire and motivate young tweens. Dallas Jessup is calling for youth activism and lays out grand plans in her fun book.

3. Questions Young People Ask, Answers That Work, Volumes 1&2 by Dr Andrea Frayser

This book provides honest workable answers to questions that kids and parents often wrestle with like: Why Don’t I Like Myself? How Do I Know if It’s Real Love? What If My Parents Are Addicted to Drugs or Alcohol? How Can I Protect Myself at School? Can I Be Happy In A Single Parent Family? and More. This is a great how to book that parents and tweens can read together.

Runner-Ups: Best Books for Young Adults and Tweens

1.Be Confident in Who You Are by Annie Fox

Sometimes worrying about what other people think can hold you back from enjoying life and from making choices that reflect who you really are. This book can help you dial down your Opinion-ator and trust yourself more. Fox is a seasoned expert in everything teen, tween and kid and her books and stories really reach young readers.

2. Conversations with Teen Entrepreneurs: Success Secrets of the Younger Generation by Ben Cathers

If you have a young reader with an entrepreneurial spirit than give them some older teens and mentors to look up to! This book helps inspire and give tweens and young adults an accurate view into starting entrepreneurial endeavors.

3. The Ultimate Girls’ Guide to Understanding and Caring for Your Body by Isabel and Emily Lluch

The book covers all the topics preteen and teen girls are wondering about but might not know who to talk to, or might not be comfortable asking an adult about, including hygiene, beauty, healthy eating, periods, bras, acne, social situations, and more. The best part: the book’s authors, Isabel and Emily Lluch, are sisters who are 13 and 16, so they know all about the changes and questions girls have during puberty. The girls give advice on these important topics, along with the advice from a panel of 6 experts in the medical and beauty industries.

Teen Pick: Best Book for Tweens and Young Adults

Here is one of our teen interns remembering which book was their favorite when they were a tween.

Holes by Louis Sachar

“I loved this book because not only was the story great, but it was thrilling and funny at the same time. Every tween has to read this book!” –Maggie, 15

Have you seen our other top picks? 

What are your favorite books for young adults and summer reading lists for tweens? Be sure to let us know!

Secrets of Body Language

Many of our readers have been asking me to post more in depth about how to read their teen’s body language. And I have finally answered the demand! I also know for our visual learners that videos are much more helpful in this regard. So I have made the Secrets of Body Language video course for you!

In this course, I will use body language videos to teach you everything you need to know about body language. We have talked about how important body language reading is for parents and some of the tips in the course will help parents tremendously in reading their child’s face and being able to spot deception.

This body language course is based on scientifically backed research on the how to read people’s nonverbal behavior and improve your own. Here are some topics the Secrets of Body Language course will cover:

  • The Foundations of Body Language
  • Nonverbal Communication and the Face
  • Emotions and Body Language
  • Human Lie Detection and Body Language

If you like reading and want this in book format, check out our book: Human Lie Detection and Body Language 101

In a ten minute conversation you are likely to be lied to two to three times. You might not even realize how often the people in your life are being deceitful. This body language book is based on scientifically backed research on the how to read people’s nonverbal behavior. In Human Lie Detection and Body Language 101 you will learn:

  • How to read body language
  • How to be a human lie detector
  • How to read people
  • How to detect hidden emotions
  • How to spot lies

Whether you are a business owner, parent, spouse, employee, human resources director, teacher or student, this book will change the way you interact with those around you.

NEW Book: Human Lie Detection and Body Language 101

Human Lie Detection and Body Language 101, how to tell when your teen is lying to you, teens and lying, lying teens, how to tell when your child is lyingGet Our Latest Book!

I have been working on helping parents with nonverbal skills and body language with teens, I finally have finished the guide to lie detection that is really relevant to anyone–parent, teen, teacher, counselor. If you have ever interacted with another person and want to understand body language I hope this book helps you!

In a ten minute conversation you are likely to be lied to two to three times. You might not even realize how often the people in your life are being deceitful.

91% of people lie regularly at home and at work

It’s time you get the tools to better equip yourself. Human Lie Detection and Body Language 101 will teach you how to spot lies as well as uncover hidden emotions in the people you are interacting with.

Most importantly, it will help you have more honest interactions with the people in your life.

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What is This Body Language Book About?

In Human Lie Detection and Body Language 101 you will learn:

  • How to read body language
  • How to be a human lie detector
  • How to read people
  • How to detect hidden emotions
  • How to spot lies

This body language book is based on scientifically backed research on the how to read people’s nonverbal behavior.

Who Is This Book For?

Whether you are a business owner, parent, spouse, employee, human resources director, teacher or student, this book will change the way you interact with those around you. Here are all of the people that can benefit from this book on body language:

  • Employers
  • Public speakers
  • Doctors
  • Human Resources Directors
  • Poker Players
  • Actors
  • Students
  • Employees
  • Parents
  • Teachers
  • Entrepreneurs

If you have ever interacted with another person, this book will be useful to you because our everyday interactions are filled with secret nonverbal cues just waiting to be uncovered.

Human Lie Detection and Body Language 101, how to tell when your teen is lying to you, teens and lying, lying teens, how to tell when your child is lyingWhat If It Doesn’t Come Naturally?

You do not have to be born with a natural inclination to read people. In fact, all people reading skills can be self-taught. Studies show that with beginner level training the average person can increase their accuracy at spotting deception from 54% to 90% accuracy.

Lying Myths:

Because this book is based in real science, it will debunk some popular myths about lying.

Lying Myth #1: If people look to the left, they are lying. If they look to the right they are telling the truth.

Although there is some science about eye direction, which we talk about in the book. It is not the most reliable form of lie detection. The book will show you more accurate (and easier) ways to spot lies.

Lying Myth #2: Liars can’t look you in the eyes.

On average, honest people will make eye contact during conversations about 60% of the time–way less than you thought, right? Liars actually look you in the eye more because they want to seei f you believe their lie or not.

Lying Myth #3: Emails and IM’s are filled with lies because it is easier to lie when people can’t see or hear you.

In the book, I will tell you which of the following have the most lies:

___Emails

___IM’s

___Phone conversations

___Face to Face interactions

I’ll give you a hint: Shockingly, we lie the MOST in phone conversations and the LEAST in emails.

Why Is Lie Detection Important?

It is important when we know we are being lied to because it can save us money, time and sometimes even our safety. This book can train you to get to the truth 80% to 90% of the time. That can save you money on a faulty house, from hiring a bad employee or making sure you know what is really going on with your child or significant other. Unfortunately, we are not good at detecting lies. We are only right about 54% of the time! That is a little better than a coin toss. We tend to assume the best in people and have a bias towards truth–“innocent until proven guilty.”

Interesting Facts About Lying

Human Lie Detection and Body Language 101, how to tell when your teen is lying to you, teens and lying, lying teens, how to tell when your child is lyingIn Human Lie Detection and Body Language 101 I give a number of real life examples and tons of practical tips that you will be able to use immediately. For example, wouldn’t it have been great to have known when Lance Armstrong was lying?

Lance Armstrong Lies

In his recent Oprah interview, Lance Armstrong’s body language was off the charts with lies and inconsistencies. He constantly made the “contempt” microexpression, which you will learn about in the book and showed how he really felt about the interview. He also showed a dominant and aggressive body posture and seating position. His words said far less than in his body. You can learn how to decode these popular culture segments on TV and in real life. Screen Shot 2012-10-19 at 10.29.59 AM

Presidential Debate Body Language

If you watched the US Presidential Debates with Mitt Romney and President Barack Obama you might have wondered what their body language was saying. Why did Obama do so badly in the first debate, but was perceived as doing so much better in the second one? You could have watched the debates on mute and learned just as much about each candidate. In the first debate President Obama cowered while looking at his notes, which you will learn in the book is submissive body language. In the second debate he stood up much straighter and was sure to get the dominant handshake in the very beginning, setting a more positive tone.

 

If you find these cases fascinating and wish you could begin to unravel the mysteries of body language, then get your copy of Human Lie Detection and Body Language 101 now!   

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Do I Get My Allowance Before or After I’m Grounded?

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M9a2jw-xhTg[/youtube]

HOORAY! Finally, parenting advice from the kid’s perspective! It’s usually impossible to get more than one-word-answers from us, but with my book “Do I Get My Allowance Before or After I’m Grounded” and my blog, I hope I can be honest about real issues that teens and pre-teens are dealing with, so you, the parents, can actually understand us (well at least a small part of our world)…and we can finally develop better relationships.

Have you ever wondered what really goes on in the mind of a teenager?
As a teenager, have you ever wondered why parents really make your curfew so early?
As a parent, have you hoped for a better understanding of the teenage years?

I am very excited to announce that my next book will be coming out in September with Plume Books–a member of Penguin Group (USA). Here is a sneak peek:

“Do I Get My Allowance Before or After I’m Grounded?” by Vanessa Van Petten

For Parents with Kids Age 7-23!

Every parent fears “losing” their child. But in this revolutionary book, youthologist Vanessa Van Petten translates what parents want to say into what teens want to hear.

At 16, Vanessa Van Petten started her award-winning website, RadicalParenting.com, in reaction to sudden friction with her parents. Today,Vanessa and more than one hundred teen contributors help thousands of parents build and maintain healthy, strong, mutually fulfilling relationships with their teenage children—by providing prescriptive advice straight from the source.

From classic fights like dating and chores to twenty-first century issues such as sexting and cyberbullying, this comprehensive book provides step-by-step guidance on every worry, including:

• Lying

• Social Networking

• School

• Peer Pressure

• Sex

• Drugs

It’s never too late to reconnect. Vanessa Van Petten helps you learn what’s really going on in your child’s life, and most importantly—understand when to put your foot down and when to let go. This book is helpful for parents with kids ages 7 to 25–the advice is timeless and can help in all parent child relationships.

VISIT MY AUTHOR PAGE

It will be available in bookstores starting 8.30.11, but you can pre-order now at the following websites: (Thank you, thank you, thank you for checking it out!)

Amazon

Barnes and Noble

Powells

Indiebound

Books a Million

Penguin

 

Teen Testimonial:

“As a teenager myself, I was greatly looking forward to reading Do I Get My Allowance Before or After I’m Grounded?  because it promised to reveal to parents a realistic teen viewpoint. I am nothing less than thoroughly impressed by how well I was able to relate to everything and by the amount of teen input. Vanessa knows how to speak for us while still creating compromises that parents can live with which is why I hope my parents read this so they can see into my world.”

-Emily, 13

In this breakthrough guide to understanding teenagers, author Vanessa Van Petten (see bio here) gives parents tricks and advice that is radically different than any other parenting book. Every topic is brought onto the table, as Van Petten delves into teenage sex, underage drinking, video games and teen drug use. Her candor and personal anecdotes help inform and calm parents’ fears by telling them how to prevent these issues from happening to their own children.

Parents will discover:
• Why teenagers do drugs, break curfew and rebel; and how to stop this destructive behavior by building trust.
• How to stop your teenager from pulling away so that you can have a better relationship; open communication and real emotional connection; and empower your teen to become a happier, more productive, more successful adult.

Testimonials and Reviews:

Publishers Weekly Review:

“Van Petten, founder of the popular Web site RadicalParenting.com, offers parents a candid view of the contemporary teen’s world in this eye-opening text. Van Petten uses actual stories about teens and their often anxious, angry, or befuddled parents to introduce each chapter. Pointing out that she is neither a parent nor a teen (nor a doctor, therapist, or counselor), the college-grad author has nevertheless earnestly investigated her subject and includes current research on teens as well as hundreds of “real quotes, interviews, e-mails and advice from actual teens.” Van Petten explores a variety of timely subjects, including peer relationships, teen/parent communication, bullying, technology, and “risky business” (smoking, drinking, sex, and more). Her outlook on technology and “Internet savvy” is particularly incisive, emphasizing not only the hazards of “time-suck” activities (i.e., Facebook, chatting on IM, and texting) but also the many social and academic benefits of the digital universe. Like a crafty spy, Van Petten comfortably segues from parent to teen perspective, and while noting that each adolescent is unique, she skillfully opens doors to the collective teen psyche. (Aug.) “

Kirkus Review:

DO I GET MY ALLOWANCE BEFORE OR AFTER I’M GROUNDED? 
Stop Fighting, Start Talking, and Get to Know Your Teen
Author: Van Petten, Vanessa

A 25-year-old “youthologist” offers firsthand insight to assist parents and children in building better relationships.

By the time Van Petten was ready to celebrate her Sweet Sixteen, she had already achieved success as the founder of RadicalParenting.com, a website that curates parenting tips from teenagers. Building on the same formula that won her numerous accolades and skyrocketed sales of her two previously self-published titles, the author culls advice from teenagers and translates it directly into language parents can understand. “Some of the advice in this book you may not like,” Van Petten cautions parents in the introduction. This might be particularly true of the chapter entitled, “Risky Business: Smoking, Drinking, Sex and More,” in which the author adamantly states from the get-go, “Every teen will engage in ‘risky’ behavior.” Practical solutions on how to address issues ranging from chores to curfews, and even cyber bullying, can be found here, in addition to exercises for parents and their teens to improve family unity. Most effective is the author’s discussion of the distractions and difficulties presented by society’s increasing reliance on technology; she suggests enforcing electronic-free times and areas and engaging in family-wide discussions about what it means to be a good cybercitizen. Van Petten’s overarching message is that all teenagers are different, and regardless of their issues, most teenagers wish their parents would talk and listen to them more, not less.

A rational approach to defuse hand-to-hand combat parenting.

Other Testimonials:

“Teens need adults they can trust to advocate for them. Parents need “ambassadors” from a younger generation to remind them about teen priorities and challenges. In “Do I get my Allowance Before or After I’m Grounded?” Vanessa Van Petten helps teens and parents understand each other better and that’s got to lead to healthier relationships all around.” –Annie Fox, M.Ed. author the Middle School Confidential™ series.

“From its unique perspective – both the teen and the adult–this book is a guide, an interpreter, and a real eye opener. It will live on your bed table as your go-to resource for the countless issues that accompany raising a teen.”—Betsy Brown Braun, author of You’re Not the Boss of Me and Just Tell Me What to Say
“As the father of a teenage daughter, I found Vanessa’s book incredibly insightful.”—Mark Gordon, producer of “Saving Private Ryan” and “Grey’s Anatomy”

Teen Internships OPEN!

We are always looking for qualified, inspired and intelligent teens. See our positions for:

-Teen Trendsetters

-Teen Advisors

-Teen Writers

RadicalParenting.com will be offering a few internships for teens! We take applications year-round. We are looking for motivated, interested and fun teen interns. We have two internships that we are currently offering: Teen Writers and Teen Marketers/Trendfinders.

Why Our Internships Rock

**We are an extremely forward thinking company started by Vanessa when she was 17 and run by many young people. We love giving teens a voice and responsibility because we think they have the best ideas.

**Our interns from last summer got amazing writing practice and marketing experience interning for us. We teach real lessons on marketing in a digital environment and offer great experience working in a digital office, which is the future of employment.

**Teen unemployment has reached an all time high of 31%, we are hoping to give teens something else to work on and learn from this summer, as jobs have become very hard to come by.

**Resume Building: We know that getting into University is becoming more and more competitive, we want to give your teen interns an extremely unique boost to their resume with this experience.

**Future recommendations: Vanessa often writes recommendations for teen interns for other jobs, college applications and programs.

**Chance to be published: For writers this is a way to practice getting your name and ideas out there. We have many publishers, authors and editors who read and scout for teens at our blog.

**Chance to network: Because we have so many corporate scouters and marketers who read our blog, we often get requests for our teen writers to get paid to write for other publications, do focus groups and even paid to blog themselves. We LOVE LOVE LOVE giving these opportunities to our interns so they can network and get paid.

#1 Teen Writer

Teen Writer Qualifications:

-Must be ages 13-18

**We have partnered to bring college internships for our 19-25 year-olds!

-Can be in High School or College

-Must be willing to work virtually for at least 2 hours per week

-Must be responsible and willing to learn

-We would love someone with a lot of energy, who is forward thinking and wants to express their opinions to help others.

-Must have strong writing skills and have a passion for writing articles about teen life.

Teen Writer Internship Description:

-Teen writers will write at least 2 articles per month 300-700 words on topics of their choice as well as topics assigned by Vanessa. This is a creative process and topics are usually discussed before writing with some guidelines.

-Writers will learn how to write engaging articles for blog audiences and the differences between online and offline articles.

-Writers will also do at least 2 hours of work per week working on extensions of their articles through comments and in our teen discussion forums. These hours can be done at any time as long as writing and task deadlines are met…we want you to have a fun summer and be able to do lots of other activities!

-Writers will be given access to our teen writer private social network where they will learn about experience marketing articles, cold emailing and how to participate in group writing activities.

-Our teen writers work in our virtual office with google documents, ning and email. They will be given their own email address and have opportunities for creative input on the website as a whole.

-Stand-out writers may have the opportunity to join the Teen Advisory Council after their term and/or be invited to stay on for a school-year internship with less hours.

-Often times teen writers will get proposals from magazines and editors to be paid to write other articles.

#2 Teen Marketer/Trendfinder

Teen Marketing Internship Qualifications:

-Must be ages 13-18

-Can be in High School or College

-Must be willing to work virtually for at least 2 hours per week

-Must be responsible and willing to learn

-We would love someone with a lot of energy, who is forward thinking and wants to express their opinions to help others.

-Must have a strong interest in marketing, public relations, advertising, social networking or publishing.

-Part of this job also entails teen trendsetting. We love applicants who have an interest in current teen trends in fashion, music, movies and entertainment.

Teen Marketing Internship Description:

-Our teen marketers work in our virtual office with google documents, Ning and email. They will be given their own email address and have opportunities for creative input on the website as a whole.

-Marketers will be given access to our teen trendsetter private social network where they will learn about experience marketing articles, cold emailing and writing press releases, contacting producers and networking with other bloggers.

-Marketers will do at least 2 hours of work per week learning new online marketing skills and performing tasks online to build their knowledge of Web 2.0 marketing. This is great experience for those wanting to go into the industry!

-Each week of our teen marketing internship is split up by topic, each week, teen marketers will learn about the skills needed for this area of the business (press releases for example) and then will spend at least 2 hours practicing these skills for Radical Parenting.com.

-Teen marketers will also explore different social networks and other web 2.0 tools to learn about this aspect of online marketing and marketing a website.

-Those interested in spotting and reporting trends will also have the opportunity to participate in our online forums.

-Stand-out trendfinders may have the opportunity to join the Teen Advisory Council after their term and/or be invited to stay on for a school-year internship with less hours.

-Often times teen marketers will get proposals from magazines and editors to be paid to participate in focus groups, find trends and test products.

How to Apply:

  • Send an email to vvanedwards@gmail.com with the subject “Internship”
  • Tell us which internship you would like to apply for.
  • Send us:

Name:

Age:

Hometown:

Why you are applying for the Teen Marketing Internship, or the Teen Writer Internship: (200-500 words)

  • If you are applying to be a teen writer, please also submit one writing sample. This can be a school essay or an article.
  • If you are applying to be a teen marketer this summer, please also submit 1 paragraph on your favorite marketing campaign this year and why. (eHarmony’s Online commercials, Nike’s superbowl commercial etc) There is no ‘right answer’ to this question, feel free to be creative with it. We want to get to know a little bit more about you and your interests.

Teen Trendsetter Program

See our Flier (or text below).

Have you ever seen a commercial, movie or product that is meant for teens, but is totally awful–and you wanted to tell someone? Here is your chance!

This group is for teens who want to express their opinions, ideas and advice about teen trends, teens and their parents and anything that youth are going through today. We have carefully selected you as a teen influencor. The group is secret for a reason, your answers will be given to thousands of parents, adults and companies around the world (anonymously of course)

Benefits for you:
-You can finally express your ideas and opinions to people who will listen and disseminate them on a large scale.
-You can put on your college application/resume that you worked as a teen influencor under Boost for Youth (we often give recommendations)
-Practice expressing and writing out your opinions
-Access to interesting trends before they come out

Teen Speakers Bureau

We have some fabulous teen speakers. If you are looking for a speaker or want to apply to be in our Bureau. Check this out!

Meet some of my current teen interns:

Laura

Age: 17

Grade: 11

Hometown: Ontario

What do you want to be when you grow-up?
Marine Biologist or Psychiatrist
What is your dream job? (If money/practicality does not matter!)
World Traveler
Do you know what you want to study in college?
Science and English
Do you know where you want to go to college?
University of British Columbia or University of Guelph
What is the biggest misconception you think parents have about teens?
That teens do not think before we act. Everyone makes mistakes, and teens are just not yet at the full level of maturity required to make some decisions we are confronted with in our lives.
If there is one thing you could tell parents about teens what would it be?
You might think teens do not listen, but they are so distracted with other things sometimes we just do not process it the first time. Try saying it again to make sure they really understand.
What is your favorite website?
www.nylonmag.com , www.youtube.com
Least favorite thing about high school, most favorite thing about high school:
Like: Learning new things, socializing, planning my future.
Dislike: The early mornings.

Meaghan

Age: 16

Grade: 11

Hometown: Zephyrhills ,Fl

What do you want to be when you grow-up?
A teacher or journalist
What is your dream job? (If money/practicality does not matter!)
Singer
Do you know what you want to study in college?
Major in Education and Minor in jouralism
Do you know where you want to go to college?
Florida Gulf Coast University
What is the biggest misconception you think parents have about teens?
They always think that other kids are not responseable. They think that only their child id perfect.
If there is one thing you could tell parents about teens what would it be?
Teenagers like to have fun. They like to act silly with their friends, don’t try to take that away with your strict rules. That makes life not fun for them.
What is your favorite website?
Omg.yahoo.com ( I get to catch up on all the Hollywood gossip!)
Least favorite thing about high school, most favorite thing about high school:
The rude kids, Cheerleading and my friends.

Sofia


Age
: 16

Grade: Junior

Hometown: Westlake Village

What do you want to be when you grow-up?
A psychologist, mainly centered with clinical therapy and psychoanalytic research
What is your dream job? (If money/practicality does not matter!)
Definitely to be a psychologist and to be able to support myself.
Do you know what you want to study in college?
Psychology as my main study but I’m completely open to anything new.
Do you know where you want to go to college?
Somewhere back east, maybe Pitt University or Colorado Boulder; there are others, I just haven’t decided yet!
What is the biggest misconception you think parents have about teens?
I think that many parents always assume that teens are up to no good all of the time, that is not always the case; I can say from personal experience that my mother always thought I was up to something but I can honestly say I am the most well behaved out of all of my friends.
If there is one thing you could tell parents about teens what would it be?
Don’t judge them based on their decisions, even if they make a few bad ones, teens are just trying to figure out who they are at this point in their lives and no one in the world learns without making a few mistakes. However, if your teen does display acts of poor judgment, don’t be afraid to give them a few pointers.
What is your favorite website?
Facebook, for sure!
Least favorite thing about high school, most favorite thing about high school:
Favorite thing: The all-over “highs school experience”, the football games and dances and making friends that I will never ever forget.
Least favorite thing: All of the people that think they’re better than you and aren’t afraid to show and tell you that; also the stresses of not only keeping up with school work, but also juggling that with family issues and maintaining a social life.

Diana

Age: 17

Grade: 11th, incoming 12th grader

Hometown: To society Los Angeles, but in my heart Guanajuato

What do you want to be when you grow-up?
I want to find a career that makes me happy and that I feel is rewarding. If I could, I would be everything, except a scientist. I want to help people educate themselves and returned the assistance that I’ve gotten from many people.
What is your dream job? (If money/practicality does not matter!)
My dream job consists of educating others while educating myself. It would have to include some traveling. I wanted to be a pastry chef but then I noticed I am a klutz, so I will just take on the finance. I would be happy as long as I don’t have to include science.
Do you know what you want to study in college?
In college I want to either study mathematics, Latin American Studies, History, Literature, or anything other than science.
Do you know where you want to go to college?
For a very long time I believed that the perfect college for me was Brown University, but now that I think about it I have many more options. Some of these are Middlebury, Wellesley, MIT, and Vassar.
What is the biggest misconception you think parents have about teens?
Parents always believe that we are doing bad deeds, whenever we aren’t in school. They always believe that we are up to no good, but they never take the time to ask.
If there is one thing you could tell parents about teens what would it be?
Parents,
You always blame us for the way we are and the way we react, but have you ever thought that we react to our surroundings? Don’t just blame us.
What is your favorite website?
My favorite website is hulu because I can see all of my favorite shows, although it has made me into an anime obsessed individual. (I always made fun of anime lovers, why me?)
Least favorite thing about high school, most favorite thing about high school:
My least favorite thing about high school my high school, there is too much drama and not enough space for it, and it is too small to hide under a rock when you know you’ve just embarrassed yourself. My favorite thing about high school is that I’ve made many friends and that I have learned a lot from my teachers and peers.


Kelly

Age: 16, going on 17

Grade: Junior

Hometown: West Palm Beach, FL

What do you want to be when you grow-up?
I would love to do anthropological research and write at the same time, documenting and learning about new cultures and new places. If I could incorporate my research into my novels (and actually sell them) it would be amazing. So really, I want to be a novelist.
What is your dream job? (If money/practicality does not matter!)
My dream job is to be a bestselling romantic novelist. I’d write about dashing heroes and beautiful heroines, but maybe with a twist in my stories. Life, love and the truth of it all is something I’m interested in.
Do you know what you want to study in college?
You don’t become a best selling writer right away…so I’m going to study anthropology and Creative writing.
Do you know where you want to go to college?
I’m actually looking at a couple of places, but my first choice is Brandeis University in Massachusetts. It’s a great school with some really amazing programs, especially in Political Science and Psychology.
What is the biggest misconception you think parents have about teens?
That we are selfish and only think about ourselves, sex, and ourselves. We’re not. We’re people who just happen to care a little bit more about our present situations. I mean seriously. We are at the crossroads of our entire lives, so don’t jump on us if we make a bad decision here or there. It is possible that we’ll learn from them.
If there is one thing you could tell parents about teens what would it be?
Please don’t confuse this with my being disrespectful, but we are not obligated to like you. It’s a good thing to listen to your parents and its one of our responsibilities, but if you’re not pleasant about it, why should we like what you’re saying? Be kind to us, please, because surprise! “treat people how you want to be treated” applies to you as well…my parents think they are God on earth, so it’s always command before nicely asking.
What is your favorite website?
Definitely YouTube. It’s so amazing to see what people can do. And I think they have virtually every song tutorial imaginable on that website.
Least favorite thing about high school, most favorite thing about high school:
Lunch and English classes are my favorite. And I’d actually rather clean the cafeteria than go to math class.

Kelsey

Age: 17

Grade
: 12

Hometown
: Franklin, TN

What do you want to be when you grow-up?
-A writer or a high school English teacher (or both)
What is your dream job? (If money/practicality does not matter!)
-A travel writer
Do you know what you want to study in college?
-English and/or Creative Writing
Do you know where you want to go to college?
-Brigham Young University
What is the biggest misconception you think parents have about teens?
-I think a lot of parents mistakenly believe that their teens aren’t trying, that they don’t care. But really, most of us actually work very hard to make our parents proud.
If there is one thing you could tell parents about teens what would it be?
-I would tell them to just remember when they were our age, and how crazy life was for them at that stage, and try to keep that in mind when they are dealing with us.
What is your favorite website?
-Right now I love Polyvore.com. You can really express yourself there and create some cool art, or just look at what other people have put together.
Least favorite thing about high school, most favorite thing about high school:
-I hate the way we all separate ourselves into cliques and how it’s so difficult to get rid of those labels. But I absolutely love the freedom and the excitement of high school, the way we can be ourselves and we’ll always find someone who’s accepting of that.

Christina

Age: 13

Grade: Going into 9th grade

Hometown: Bloomfield Hills, MI

What do you want to be when you grow-up?
I would love to be a photographer or artist.
What is your dream job? (If money/practicality does not matter!)
A photographer! I love to take pictures…
Do you know what you want to study in college?
I want to study law or performing arts.
Do you know where you want to go to college?
I’m not sure yet…
What is the biggest misconception you think parents have about teens?
I think parents think all teens are the same…obsessed with sex and thigns like that…but they’re not!
If there is one thing you could tell parents about teens what would it be?
That they’re just like you, just 20 years ago!
What is your favorite website?
I love youtube…it’s the best.

Alexis

Age: 16

Grade: 11

Hometown: Armonk, NY

What do you want to be when you grow-up?
An actress
What is your dream job? (If money/practicality does not matter!)
Being an actress :)
Do you know what you want to study in college?
I want to double major in Drama and English
Do you know where you want to go to college?
Barnard College of Columbia University is my top choice
What is the biggest misconception you think parents have about teens?
That we don’t care. We do, we really do, we just don’t know how to show it all the time.
If there is one thing you could tell parents about teens what would it be?
We want to talk to our parents as much as you want to talk to us, it’s just sometimes easier to go to our friends.
What is your favorite website?
I think Facebook. I know, how stereotypical of me!
Least favorite thing about high school, most favorite thing about high school:
Least Favorite: The stress! Especially during Junior Year
Favorite: Making friends with people of all different ages and theatre

Nate

Age: 16

City: Los Angeles, CA

Favorite Color: Blue

Favorite Food: Chinese

Favorite Place to travel: between the Negev and the Golan (both places in Israel)

Least favorite thing about High School: Homework and Tests.

Most Favorite Thing About High School: All of the technology classes, Tech theater, and my friends.

He also has an awesome blog called Nate Rocks!

Juliette

Juliette is a 15-year-old high school student in North Carolina. She is interested in pursuing a career in writing and in her free time enjoys volleyball, juggling, and photography.

-My name: Juliette
-My Grade: 11
-Home State: North Carolina
-Favorite movie: The Illusionist
-Favorite website: Wikipedia

-Favorite topic to write about: Topics that I have personal experience with or effect my life

Biggest misconception about teens: That we are constantly trying to find ways to go behind our parents back and generally deceive them.

-What you wish all parents knew: Your teen’s behavior is highly guided by your own actions and this can be having either a good or bad effect.

I am in many ways in ordinary teen: going to the movies with friends, going to high school, and of course dealing with my parents. However, I am rather unordinary in that I will be blogging about teenage life in order to help you understand the world your teen lives in. I love to write and I am looking forward to blogging on this site very much. Hopefully, my entries will be as enjoyable for you to read as they were for me to write.

Alia

Alia is a 13 year-old from Nebraska. She loves to play the Acoustic guitar and, wants to be famous musician and a famous actor in Hollywood.

My name is Alia. My home state is Nebraska (Go cornhuskers! lol). I love to play the Acoustic guitar. I am currently in the eigth grade studying concert band as my major and percussion as my minor.

I would have to say my favorite movie of all time is, The Chronicles Of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe. I absolutely love the message in that movie.

Like most teens these days, my favorite website is youtube.

The topic that I like to write about the most is The Everyday Lives Of Teens, from the relationships, to the gossip, to the hurt and pain.

I think the biggest misconception about teens is the thought that, we don’t don’t understand or we don’t care about anyone else but ourselves. Teens have feelings just like everyone else. We might not show it in the best way ever, but we still care about other people. The one thing I wish all parents knew is, that teens not only want them (our parents) to hear us, but to actually listen.

Shannon

My name is Shannon and I am at the ripe old age of sixteen. I have the fantastic privilege of interning for Vanessa Van Petten and I wanted to properly introduce myself by giving you a snapshot of my life and my view of the world.

I currently reside in Maryland, home of the Chesapeake Bay and Washington Wizards. I’ve found that it is a bit dull here when it comes to excitement. I mean, I’d never expect to have one of those “I was just walking down the street and you’ll never guess who I ran into…” stories. But on the upside, we do have exceptionally interesting weather and experience all four of the glorious seasons—spring, summer, winter, and fall.

I attend a private all girls High School. I usually receive a variety of interesting and sometimes peculiar comments about this because a) it is a private, all girls high school, b) it’s a Catholic school and c) the neighborhood where it’s located is a bit sketchy. Some of the more outlandish and humorous ones include: “Have you ever been shot?” “Are there a lot of lesbians at your school?” “Do you really have to wear those uniform shoes every day?”

So anyway, I’ve just finished sophomore year which I find both exciting and scary. Exciting because it means one year closer to freedom and scary because it means…one year closer to freedom. All I ever hear from my friends is that they want to get out of high school, onto college, and start “real life”. But to me real life doesn’t just mean being freed from the rules that my mother enforces. Real life means change. It comes with real responsibility, real decision-making, and the need to really know what you want. If you were to ask which me of those things I find both terrifying and exhilarating I would check the box marked “All of the Above”.

I am a total movie-holic. I don’t have a specific favorite movie because I watch so many so often that it changes all the time. I do, however, have a specific collection of movies that could be considered my favorites because I never get tired of watching them. They are as follows:

The Notebook— I always cry when I watch this movie. It makes me feel hopeful that true love might actually exist.

Pirates of the Caribbean— First of all, the fact that pirates get to do whatever they want is fantastic. Also, the sword fighting and the music during scenes are always in sync. That combined with the humor, action and romance makes for a very entertaining trilogy.

Ocean’s 11/12/13— It completely blows my mind that there are actually people in this world who are smart enough to pull off heists like the ones in these movies.

The Bourne Identity/Supremacy/Ultimatum— These movies always give me chills. To think that it is possible for the government to have that much power and that much control without the public knowing—scary. Plus Matt Damon is a total babe and the character he plays is practically a military robot which I think is super cool.

My favorite website is Facebook. Yes, I know that sounds like a stereotypical teenage cliché, but I can’t help it. The creator of this website is truly a genius. I’m not kidding when I tell you it’s an addiction. Every time I get on the computer my fingers are instantly itching to visit my profile and check out all the latest news and newest scandals. With the push of a button I have immediate access to all the intriguing lives of the people I know and love. Plus, it’s an easy way for me to keep up with my friends who are out of state or off at college. Who could want more than that?

I don’t think I could narrow it down to one topic that is my absolute favorite to write about. I like expressing my opinion about all sorts of things but there are a few that have earned the title of my favorites. They include: sex, true love, alcohol and drugs: condone or condemn?, equality—black vs. white, women vs. men, etc., and my all-time favorite: Nick Jonas. Yes, Nick Jonas. As for as boys go, NickJ is totally boss. My mind wanders to that shy-smiling, piano playing, finger tingling, singer/song writer quite often.

One of the biggest misconceptions about teens is that all teenagers are having or are thinking about having sex. I’m not saying that we don’t think about sex, but a lot of us aren’t actually interested in doing it. Our lives are busy enough! Trying to balance school and sports and clubs and social lives is already difficult. Throwing sex into the mix brings about a whole new list of complications that we literally don’t have time to deal with. Plus, the majority of us either don’t have jobs or don’t have jobs that pay well enough for us to support a kid or to pay for secret STD checkups.

One thing I wish all parents knew is how badly we, as teens, seek their approval. Most of the time we flat our refuse to admit it, but really and truly we just want to satisfy them. And one of the reasons it is so easy for us to pick fights with them is because we feel like we’re busting our butts trying to please them and all they can do is point out our flaws. It’s not that they say, “I think you suck” but small things, like mentioning the C we got on our paper instead of congratulating us on the A we received on our test, really hit us hard.

Samantha

-Grade: 12

-Home State: California

-Favorite movie: Sweet Home Alabama and P.S. I Love You

-Favorite website: TeenVogue.com and Forever21.com

-Favorite topic to write about: Fashion

-Biggest misconception about teens: “Teens don’t know….” I can’t count how many times I have heard the expression “Teens don’t know…” It commonly is said when parents are talking about the teen generation and how teens don’t know how the teen world is. Newsflash: We Are the Teen World. The misconception of our age and how we go about our day in the teen world, and how we should play a part in that world is built up by this image and understanding by adults on how teens should be in society.

-What you wish all parents knew: We don’t mean to make you hurt sometimes, we are immature and are still learning; developing into mature young adults.

-Hello my name is Samantha. I’m a 17-year-old aspiring fashion journalist who lives in the O.C.

Emma

Emma is a high schooler living in North Carolina (yearning to move to NYC.) She wants to be a writer. She believes in fairies.

Name: Emma

Grade: Ninth/Freshman/First year of high school (You get to hear all about my new high school experiences!)

Home state: North Carolina

Favorite movie: I’m currently obsessed with Sweeney Todd, but other favorites are: Titanic, Pride and Prejudice, Phantom of the Opera, Edward Scissorhands, Chicago and What’s Eating Gilbert Grape. (There is a definite trend toward movies with amazing music, Johnny Depp, and Leonardo DiCaprio.)

Favorite website: http://vampirelibrarian.blogspot.com/2006/04/hot-commodity.html

Favorite topic to write about: Lovely little teenage idiosyncrasies. Like the slow up and down look that girls give you as they try and use x-ray vision to read the brand name on the tags/labels of your clothes. (Fortunately I cut the tags out of my clothing. I win!)

Biggest misconception about teens: We say “like” and “um” every other word out of pure spite and hatred of adults. Actually, most teens really wish they could stop this habit, but you try spending seven hours a day with teenagers and not pick up this terrible tic.

What I wish all parents knew: It’s really easy for today’s teens to get into situations way beyond what they can handle. Unfortunately, parents rarely can guess/notice what’s going on in their child’s life (frequently because the issue at hand wasn’t around when they were growing up.) Teens need and want (even if they won’t admit it) an adult to help them.

Sarah

Sarah is a 16 year old girl from Connecticut. She enjoys singing, dancing, and one day would like to be a teen fiction author.

Your Grade: 11

Home State: Connecticut

Favorite movie: Pride & Prejudice

Favorite website: Facebook

Favorite topic to write about: Insight to everyday teen issues

Biggest misconception about teens: All teens are rebellious and are only concerned with superficial things

What you wish all parents knew: If you want us to respect you, respect us

Carina

Carina is a 16 year-old high school student in Grade 11. She is interested in dancing and acting and in her free time enjoys writing stories, or drawing.

-My name: Carina

-My Grade: 11

-Home Province: Ontario

-Favorite movie: The Illusionist or Chicago

-Favorite website: www.shockwave.com

-Favorite topic to write about: Anything about goal setting, or achieving something

-Biggest misconception about teens: We’re smarter and work harder then you think. Sometimes we seem so mischievous but really, we take care in what we are passionate about. Give us a chance and you’ll see.

-What you wish all parents knew: Treat us the way you want to be treated. If you are over-protected or treat us like babies, we will back away and never want to speak to you cause it seems either controlling or degrading. Just treat us like young adults. OH! And just cause you’re yelling at us to do something, doesn’t make us want to do it more. Trust me, that room will be clean when we realize for ourselves a tornado hit it!

Carys

First Name: Carys

Age: Thirteen

City, Country: Arouca, Trinidad

Favorite Color: Pink, Red, Blue.

Favorite Food: Pelau

Favorite Place to travel: California

Least favorite thing about School: The tests.

Most Favorite Thing About School: Homework and Friends.

Favorite Website: quibblo.com

What you wish all parents knew: That if you watch over your children too much, they will rebel against your rules.

Biggest misconception about teens: The mean things they say are not because they mean it, but no one understands them, yet.

Gema

Gema is a new teen writer for us, she is a 17-year old from Miami, FL. She is obsessed with writing and reading young adult fiction and hopes to one day be a published author.

Age: 17

Favorite color: dark red

Favorite food
: spaghetti

Favorite place to travel: Nicaragua

Least favorite thing about high school, most favorite thing about high school:

My least favorite thing about high school would have to be the pressure of SAT’S and other standard tests in order to get into a good college. It makes you feel like a failure if you don’t get an adequate score.. My favorite thing about high school is the experiences, the friends and the memories. Even as you live the moments, you know you’ll remember them forever.

What do you want to be when you grow-up?: At the moment, I want to be a pharmacist. I enjoy chemistry and the thought of helping people. Being a doctor always felt like too much of a morbid job, but pharmacy offers a nugget hope with every medicine.

My dream job would be to be a full time author. I would love to spend the rest of my life writing about the characters in my head and the adventures they go through and the things they learn about human nature.

Do you know what you want to study in college?: Ideally, I would love to take creative writing courses and history. But I’ll be studying pharmacy.

The biggest misconception parents have about teens is that they don’t have any problems. I can’t even count the number of times my own parents have said: “you have nothing to worry about, you’re only [insert age here].” Granted, most of us don’t have to worry about bills and keeping our jobs and all of that, but our little problems are our own, and whether they are big or small, they are still important to us.

If there is one thing you could tell parents about teens what would it be?: I would probably tell parents that not all of us hatch a top secret plan every morning that is designed to drive them into an insane asylum. Teens are humans and prone to make mistakes and some of them are willing to learn from those mistakes.

What is your favorite website? Youtube. I am currently addicted to vlogbrothers.

Becca

Becca is a 16 year-old from West Palm Beach, FL. She loves to cook and travel, and she would like to study International Business in the future.Favorite color: Blue

Least favorite thing about high school, most favorite thing about high school:

Least– Drudge work or anything that wastes my time

Most– The ability to create an image for yourself.

What do you want to be when you grow-up? Something where I can travel. I love going new places and seeing new things and speaking other languages. I speak Hebrew fluently and am in my 5th year of Spanish. I would really like to learn at least one or two more languages.

What is your dream job? International Business of some sort/ Mother

What is the biggest misconception you think parents have about teens? Adults in general think that teenagers are so self-centered that they fail to recognize that there are bigger problems in the world. Although teens may not express this at every given chance, a larger portion of the teenage population than most parents think is, in fact, aware.

If there is one thing you could tell parents about teens what would it be? Extremity on either end of the parenting spectrum is negative in the long run. Parents who are too lax with their kids will not retain the respect that is necessary, but extremely strict parents will end up turning their children away. Also, teens have to learn to make their own choices. You can’t always stop a mistake before it happens, or your child will never learn for him or herself.

What is your favorite website? I don’t think I have one, but the one I use most often is Google, I guess.

For Schools

We have a ton of resources for schools at Radical Parenting. Check out what we have for you below:

1. Virtual School: How Academics have gone Virtual

In this section we have a whole series of articles on school and how it is gone virtual!

2. School Speaker:

Vanessa Van Petten travels the country speaking to schools about family relationships, teen lifestyles, school-life balance and many other issues pertaining to 2nd through 12th grade students. Vanessa has done hundreds of school events in a lively and fun event format. She typically does a rotation of three hours back to back, one for students, one for teachers and one for parents!

Here are her most popular talks for schools:

 

  • Understanding the Net-Generation, Digital Kids in Adult Friendly Terms

This workshop gives a complete overview into what kids and teens 6-18 are doing online and how parents and adults can leverage the Internet’s assets and help their children avoid it’s pitfalls. We also look at social applications, online trends and even slang. Vanessa talks about how technology is affecting all areas of life in new ways–friendship, dating, school and even self-esteem.

  • Teen Secret Communication 101: The Science of Relationships

Have you ever wished you could know when someone was lying to you? In this dynamic presentation, Vanessa Van Petten teaches teens and parents how they can use scientific research to get what they want from their relationships, stop fighting and understand their sometimes frustrating counterparts. Using social and emotional literacy skills, Vanessa provides youth with a new strategy to fight bullying, lying and drama. Vanessa’s unique perspective, hilarious stories and groundbreaking research have stunned and delighted audiences all over the world.

  • Social Literacy: Anti-Clique and Anti-Bullying

This program is unlike any other parent or teen workshop. Ranging from audiences of 12 to 600 Vanessa teaches participants how to use a totally new form of communication to radically change the anger/guilt cycle, clique formation and the decline of teen empathy.

For more info on Vanessa’s speaking for schools, click here.

“My wife and I were so impressed with the topic and your presentation. You are amazingly articulate (no ums, you know, ahhs), on point, concise, poised, with good presence and comedic timing.  And not just for your age – for any public speaker.  You have a career in television.  I can’t believe how polished you are.  You made the time fly.

For the first time, I got the generation gap between my son (16 years-old) and me (46).  All parents know there will be a generation gap.  This is as certain as death and taxes.  But your insight into technology, youths’ need for connectiveness, their “playground”, “friends”, social pressure, and sadly, their collective weakness to interact person-to-person, were mind-blowing.

I have a much better understanding of what taking away a cell phone or computer means to our son when he’s grounded.  It makes some of his behavior (good and bad) more understandable.  (He’s glued to YouTube.)

I was slightly skeptical that a young person like you could provide helpful parenting advice.  In an era when a seven-year-old can give relationship advice (true story), I thought you had to be older and be a parent first.  Boy, was I wrong.  Your insight was gold to us and we will always appreciate your information. We bought your book and look forward to reading it. –John Chavez”

3. School Related Articles:

6 Ways to Multi-Task

It is important to teach middle school students how to multi-task effectively.  We want to make sure students are studying well.

How to be More Efficient

Have you ever sat down yourself or with your child to do homework and it just moves so slowly? This is a problem with efficiency and we consider efficiency an ultimate study skill and give you some easy tips for it.

How to Stop Procrastinating

Middle school students are young enough to learn how to avoid procrastination habits early.  If they learn to use study skills early, their grades will benefit significantly.

Reading Study Skills: How to Memorize As You Read

This is a great skill to practice early.  Many people do not apply study skills to reading, but we think it is a great way to absorb your reading and study as you do homework reading.

5 Tips for Wandering Workers

Do you have a wandering worker? Are you a wandering worker? Find out!

Pros and Cons of Virtual Studying

More and more of school is going online.  Here are some of our favorite free tools.

How to Cure School Burn-Out

Usually middle school students aren’t burned out yet.  But you might want to read this article to prepare for the end of school blues.

Emailing Teachers: 5 Tips to Successfully Email Teachers

As schooling becomes more and more virtual (e-books, online homework, etc) it is important to learn how to develop proper relationships with teachers online as well as in class

Teacher CyberBating: Terrible Teen Classroom Trend Teens are now angering teachers, filming their reaction and then putting it all over YouTube…what can we do?

 

 

 


Clique Workshops for Girls

We have created specialized workshops for self-esteem, friendships and healthy lifestyle planning and prevent against bullying, cliques and risky behaviors.

Vanessa’s Story:

Vanessa Van Petten, teen author of the parenting book “You’re Grounded!,” writes RadicalParenting.com along with 60 teen writers, ages 12-20 to help parents and adults get an honest and open view into the world and mind of youth. Van Petten, now 25, graduated Magna Cum Laude from Emory University in May of 2007, the same month, her book “You’re Grounded!” launched and was named in the “Top 5 Hottest Books” on Amazon it’s first month.

•Her site contains thousands of articles, videos, screencasts and live chats with Van Petten, teen writers and trendsetters from 34 different coutnries to offer parents a win- dow into the daily lives of their teen and tween kids. She shows parents how to talk with their screen-obsessed net generation children about everything: including safely using Facebook, smoking pot, High School dances, oral sex, and gives them tips from actual teens.

•Van Petten is now on an international speaking tour and was chosen as one of the top 100 Bloggers to watch by Women’s Magazine.

•Radicalparenting.com is read by thousands of teens and parents daily. In January 2009 she spoke at the Consumer Electronics Show at the session “Teens and Social Networking.”

•She was featured on CNN, CBS 4 Miami and Fox 5 New York and has been in the Wall Street Journal, Teen Vogue, MSN Money, Good Housekeeping Online, Atlanta Insite Magazine and the World Journal. She has been an expert on Playboy Radio, KBUR, WCOJ Philadelphia and more for giving a young perspective on awesome parenting.

Vanessa’s Mission Statement: To improve parent-teen relationships by providing them with new perspectives, stories and neutral places to communicate. This will help families build strong relationships that promote healthy attitudes and lifestyle behaviors in this generation of young adults.

What Makes Vanessa Different: One of the reasons so many communities have brought Vanessa to speak is because she is young enough to know where teens are coming from and have them open up to her and she is old enough to respect and translate for parents. She also interacts with thousands of teens on a weekly basis, her research studies, one-on-one work and position in the media give her a platform to understand youth in a very different way.

Radical Approach: Vanessa teaches, applies and is currently doing research on the principles of Dr. Paul Ekman on human lie detecting and emotional reading. She often teaches audiences–both teens and parents, how to read facial microexpressions, be a human lie detector and excel at social literacy to be able to read who they are communicating with. Vanessa has found this essential to her help for teens and parents. Parents learn to better understand their teenager and kids grasp the importance of social literacy to prevent bullying, cliques and miscommunication with their parents. This makes for lively and unique presentations.

See our media page for clips, reviews and testimonials. Also see Vanessa’s Consulting.

  • Social Literacy: Anti-Clique, Argument Prevention and How to be a Human Lie Detector

This program is unlike any other parent or teen workshop. Ranging from audiences of 12 to 600 Vanessa teaches participants how to use a totally new form of communication to radically change the anger/guilt cycle, clique formation and the decline of teen empathy.

Girl Workshops

Vanessa uses very unique techniques to connect with and teach girls about self-care, bully prevention, cliques, jealousy and drama. To get more details on her approach, feel free to contact us.

-Dating (Choices, break-ups, safe sex)

-Friendship Challenges, the mean-girl syndrome, growing apart, betrayal, conflicts, competition and cliques.

-Academic and School pressures

-Career planning, resume building and confusing feelings about direction in life.

-Challenging family relationships

-Decision Making

-Negative self-esteem, confidence, self-destructive behavior and overall self-acceptance

Also see our Teen Speaker’s Bureau

Testimonial:

“My wife and I were so impressed with the topic and your presentation.

You are amazingly articulate (no ums, you know, ahhs), on point, concise, poised, with good presence and comedic timing. And not just for your age – for any public speaker. You have a career in television. I can’t believe how polished you are. You made the time fly.

For the first time, I got the generation gap between my son (16 years-old) and me (46). All parents know there will be a generation gap. This is as certain as death and taxes. But your insight into technology, youths’ need for connectiveness, their “playground”, “friends”, social pressure, and sadly, their collective weakness to interact person-to-person, were mind-blowing.

I have a much better understanding of what taking away a cell phone or computer means to our son when he’s grounded. It makes some of his behavior (good and bad) more understandable. (He’s glued to YouTube.)

I was slightly skeptical that a young person like you could provide helpful parenting advice. In an era when a seven-year-old can give relationship advice (true story), I thought you had to be older and be a parent first. Boy, was I wrong. Your insight was gold to us and we will always appreciate your information.

We bought your book and look forward to reading it.
John Chavez”

See more testimonials here.