Teen Internships OPEN!

We are always looking for qualified, inspired and intelligent teens. See our positions for:

-Teen Trendsetters

-Teen Advisors

-Teen Writers

RadicalParenting.com will be offering a few internships for teens! We take applications year-round. We are looking for motivated, interested and fun teen interns. We have two internships that we are currently offering: Teen Writers and Teen Marketers/Trendfinders.

Why Our Internships Rock

**We are an extremely forward thinking company started by Vanessa when she was 17 and run by many young people. We love giving teens a voice and responsibility because we think they have the best ideas.

**Our interns from last summer got amazing writing practice and marketing experience interning for us. We teach real lessons on marketing in a digital environment and offer great experience working in a digital office, which is the future of employment.

**Teen unemployment has reached an all time high of 31%, we are hoping to give teens something else to work on and learn from this summer, as jobs have become very hard to come by.

**Resume Building: We know that getting into University is becoming more and more competitive, we want to give your teen interns an extremely unique boost to their resume with this experience.

**Future recommendations: Vanessa often writes recommendations for teen interns for other jobs, college applications and programs.

**Chance to be published: For writers this is a way to practice getting your name and ideas out there. We have many publishers, authors and editors who read and scout for teens at our blog.

**Chance to network: Because we have so many corporate scouters and marketers who read our blog, we often get requests for our teen writers to get paid to write for other publications, do focus groups and even paid to blog themselves. We LOVE LOVE LOVE giving these opportunities to our interns so they can network and get paid.

#1 Teen Writer

Teen Writer Qualifications:

-Must be ages 13-18

**We have partnered to bring college internships for our 19-25 year-olds!

-Can be in High School or College

-Must be willing to work virtually for at least 2 hours per week

-Must be responsible and willing to learn

-We would love someone with a lot of energy, who is forward thinking and wants to express their opinions to help others.

-Must have strong writing skills and have a passion for writing articles about teen life.

Teen Writer Internship Description:

-Teen writers will write at least 2 articles per month 300-700 words on topics of their choice as well as topics assigned by Vanessa. This is a creative process and topics are usually discussed before writing with some guidelines.

-Writers will learn how to write engaging articles for blog audiences and the differences between online and offline articles.

-Writers will also do at least 2 hours of work per week working on extensions of their articles through comments and in our teen discussion forums. These hours can be done at any time as long as writing and task deadlines are met…we want you to have a fun summer and be able to do lots of other activities!

-Writers will be given access to our teen writer private social network where they will learn about experience marketing articles, cold emailing and how to participate in group writing activities.

-Our teen writers work in our virtual office with google documents, ning and email. They will be given their own email address and have opportunities for creative input on the website as a whole.

-Stand-out writers may have the opportunity to join the Teen Advisory Council after their term and/or be invited to stay on for a school-year internship with less hours.

-Often times teen writers will get proposals from magazines and editors to be paid to write other articles.

#2 Teen Marketer/Trendfinder

Teen Marketing Internship Qualifications:

-Must be ages 13-18

-Can be in High School or College

-Must be willing to work virtually for at least 2 hours per week

-Must be responsible and willing to learn

-We would love someone with a lot of energy, who is forward thinking and wants to express their opinions to help others.

-Must have a strong interest in marketing, public relations, advertising, social networking or publishing.

-Part of this job also entails teen trendsetting. We love applicants who have an interest in current teen trends in fashion, music, movies and entertainment.

Teen Marketing Internship Description:

-Our teen marketers work in our virtual office with google documents, Ning and email. They will be given their own email address and have opportunities for creative input on the website as a whole.

-Marketers will be given access to our teen trendsetter private social network where they will learn about experience marketing articles, cold emailing and writing press releases, contacting producers and networking with other bloggers.

-Marketers will do at least 2 hours of work per week learning new online marketing skills and performing tasks online to build their knowledge of Web 2.0 marketing. This is great experience for those wanting to go into the industry!

-Each week of our teen marketing internship is split up by topic, each week, teen marketers will learn about the skills needed for this area of the business (press releases for example) and then will spend at least 2 hours practicing these skills for Radical Parenting.com.

-Teen marketers will also explore different social networks and other web 2.0 tools to learn about this aspect of online marketing and marketing a website.

-Those interested in spotting and reporting trends will also have the opportunity to participate in our online forums.

-Stand-out trendfinders may have the opportunity to join the Teen Advisory Council after their term and/or be invited to stay on for a school-year internship with less hours.

-Often times teen marketers will get proposals from magazines and editors to be paid to participate in focus groups, find trends and test products.

How to Apply:

  • Send an email to vvanedwards@gmail.com with the subject “Internship”
  • Tell us which internship you would like to apply for.
  • Send us:

Name:

Age:

Hometown:

Why you are applying for the Teen Marketing Internship, or the Teen Writer Internship: (200-500 words)

  • If you are applying to be a teen writer, please also submit one writing sample. This can be a school essay or an article.
  • If you are applying to be a teen marketer this summer, please also submit 1 paragraph on your favorite marketing campaign this year and why. (eHarmony’s Online commercials, Nike’s superbowl commercial etc) There is no ‘right answer’ to this question, feel free to be creative with it. We want to get to know a little bit more about you and your interests.

Teen Trendsetter Program

See our Flier (or text below).

Have you ever seen a commercial, movie or product that is meant for teens, but is totally awful–and you wanted to tell someone? Here is your chance!

This group is for teens who want to express their opinions, ideas and advice about teen trends, teens and their parents and anything that youth are going through today. We have carefully selected you as a teen influencor. The group is secret for a reason, your answers will be given to thousands of parents, adults and companies around the world (anonymously of course)

Benefits for you:
-You can finally express your ideas and opinions to people who will listen and disseminate them on a large scale.
-You can put on your college application/resume that you worked as a teen influencor under Boost for Youth (we often give recommendations)
-Practice expressing and writing out your opinions
-Access to interesting trends before they come out

Teen Speakers Bureau

We have some fabulous teen speakers. If you are looking for a speaker or want to apply to be in our Bureau. Check this out!

Meet some of my current teen interns:

Laura

Age: 17

Grade: 11

Hometown: Ontario

What do you want to be when you grow-up?
Marine Biologist or Psychiatrist
What is your dream job? (If money/practicality does not matter!)
World Traveler
Do you know what you want to study in college?
Science and English
Do you know where you want to go to college?
University of British Columbia or University of Guelph
What is the biggest misconception you think parents have about teens?
That teens do not think before we act. Everyone makes mistakes, and teens are just not yet at the full level of maturity required to make some decisions we are confronted with in our lives.
If there is one thing you could tell parents about teens what would it be?
You might think teens do not listen, but they are so distracted with other things sometimes we just do not process it the first time. Try saying it again to make sure they really understand.
What is your favorite website?
www.nylonmag.com , www.youtube.com
Least favorite thing about high school, most favorite thing about high school:
Like: Learning new things, socializing, planning my future.
Dislike: The early mornings.

Meaghan

Age: 16

Grade: 11

Hometown: Zephyrhills ,Fl

What do you want to be when you grow-up?
A teacher or journalist
What is your dream job? (If money/practicality does not matter!)
Singer
Do you know what you want to study in college?
Major in Education and Minor in jouralism
Do you know where you want to go to college?
Florida Gulf Coast University
What is the biggest misconception you think parents have about teens?
They always think that other kids are not responseable. They think that only their child id perfect.
If there is one thing you could tell parents about teens what would it be?
Teenagers like to have fun. They like to act silly with their friends, don’t try to take that away with your strict rules. That makes life not fun for them.
What is your favorite website?
Omg.yahoo.com ( I get to catch up on all the Hollywood gossip!)
Least favorite thing about high school, most favorite thing about high school:
The rude kids, Cheerleading and my friends.

Sofia


Age
: 16

Grade: Junior

Hometown: Westlake Village

What do you want to be when you grow-up?
A psychologist, mainly centered with clinical therapy and psychoanalytic research
What is your dream job? (If money/practicality does not matter!)
Definitely to be a psychologist and to be able to support myself.
Do you know what you want to study in college?
Psychology as my main study but I’m completely open to anything new.
Do you know where you want to go to college?
Somewhere back east, maybe Pitt University or Colorado Boulder; there are others, I just haven’t decided yet!
What is the biggest misconception you think parents have about teens?
I think that many parents always assume that teens are up to no good all of the time, that is not always the case; I can say from personal experience that my mother always thought I was up to something but I can honestly say I am the most well behaved out of all of my friends.
If there is one thing you could tell parents about teens what would it be?
Don’t judge them based on their decisions, even if they make a few bad ones, teens are just trying to figure out who they are at this point in their lives and no one in the world learns without making a few mistakes. However, if your teen does display acts of poor judgment, don’t be afraid to give them a few pointers.
What is your favorite website?
Facebook, for sure!
Least favorite thing about high school, most favorite thing about high school:
Favorite thing: The all-over “highs school experience”, the football games and dances and making friends that I will never ever forget.
Least favorite thing: All of the people that think they’re better than you and aren’t afraid to show and tell you that; also the stresses of not only keeping up with school work, but also juggling that with family issues and maintaining a social life.

Diana

Age: 17

Grade: 11th, incoming 12th grader

Hometown: To society Los Angeles, but in my heart Guanajuato

What do you want to be when you grow-up?
I want to find a career that makes me happy and that I feel is rewarding. If I could, I would be everything, except a scientist. I want to help people educate themselves and returned the assistance that I’ve gotten from many people.
What is your dream job? (If money/practicality does not matter!)
My dream job consists of educating others while educating myself. It would have to include some traveling. I wanted to be a pastry chef but then I noticed I am a klutz, so I will just take on the finance. I would be happy as long as I don’t have to include science.
Do you know what you want to study in college?
In college I want to either study mathematics, Latin American Studies, History, Literature, or anything other than science.
Do you know where you want to go to college?
For a very long time I believed that the perfect college for me was Brown University, but now that I think about it I have many more options. Some of these are Middlebury, Wellesley, MIT, and Vassar.
What is the biggest misconception you think parents have about teens?
Parents always believe that we are doing bad deeds, whenever we aren’t in school. They always believe that we are up to no good, but they never take the time to ask.
If there is one thing you could tell parents about teens what would it be?
Parents,
You always blame us for the way we are and the way we react, but have you ever thought that we react to our surroundings? Don’t just blame us.
What is your favorite website?
My favorite website is hulu because I can see all of my favorite shows, although it has made me into an anime obsessed individual. (I always made fun of anime lovers, why me?)
Least favorite thing about high school, most favorite thing about high school:
My least favorite thing about high school my high school, there is too much drama and not enough space for it, and it is too small to hide under a rock when you know you’ve just embarrassed yourself. My favorite thing about high school is that I’ve made many friends and that I have learned a lot from my teachers and peers.


Kelly

Age: 16, going on 17

Grade: Junior

Hometown: West Palm Beach, FL

What do you want to be when you grow-up?
I would love to do anthropological research and write at the same time, documenting and learning about new cultures and new places. If I could incorporate my research into my novels (and actually sell them) it would be amazing. So really, I want to be a novelist.
What is your dream job? (If money/practicality does not matter!)
My dream job is to be a bestselling romantic novelist. I’d write about dashing heroes and beautiful heroines, but maybe with a twist in my stories. Life, love and the truth of it all is something I’m interested in.
Do you know what you want to study in college?
You don’t become a best selling writer right away…so I’m going to study anthropology and Creative writing.
Do you know where you want to go to college?
I’m actually looking at a couple of places, but my first choice is Brandeis University in Massachusetts. It’s a great school with some really amazing programs, especially in Political Science and Psychology.
What is the biggest misconception you think parents have about teens?
That we are selfish and only think about ourselves, sex, and ourselves. We’re not. We’re people who just happen to care a little bit more about our present situations. I mean seriously. We are at the crossroads of our entire lives, so don’t jump on us if we make a bad decision here or there. It is possible that we’ll learn from them.
If there is one thing you could tell parents about teens what would it be?
Please don’t confuse this with my being disrespectful, but we are not obligated to like you. It’s a good thing to listen to your parents and its one of our responsibilities, but if you’re not pleasant about it, why should we like what you’re saying? Be kind to us, please, because surprise! “treat people how you want to be treated” applies to you as well…my parents think they are God on earth, so it’s always command before nicely asking.
What is your favorite website?
Definitely YouTube. It’s so amazing to see what people can do. And I think they have virtually every song tutorial imaginable on that website.
Least favorite thing about high school, most favorite thing about high school:
Lunch and English classes are my favorite. And I’d actually rather clean the cafeteria than go to math class.

Kelsey

Age: 17

Grade
: 12

Hometown
: Franklin, TN

What do you want to be when you grow-up?
-A writer or a high school English teacher (or both)
What is your dream job? (If money/practicality does not matter!)
-A travel writer
Do you know what you want to study in college?
-English and/or Creative Writing
Do you know where you want to go to college?
-Brigham Young University
What is the biggest misconception you think parents have about teens?
-I think a lot of parents mistakenly believe that their teens aren’t trying, that they don’t care. But really, most of us actually work very hard to make our parents proud.
If there is one thing you could tell parents about teens what would it be?
-I would tell them to just remember when they were our age, and how crazy life was for them at that stage, and try to keep that in mind when they are dealing with us.
What is your favorite website?
-Right now I love Polyvore.com. You can really express yourself there and create some cool art, or just look at what other people have put together.
Least favorite thing about high school, most favorite thing about high school:
-I hate the way we all separate ourselves into cliques and how it’s so difficult to get rid of those labels. But I absolutely love the freedom and the excitement of high school, the way we can be ourselves and we’ll always find someone who’s accepting of that.

Christina

Age: 13

Grade: Going into 9th grade

Hometown: Bloomfield Hills, MI

What do you want to be when you grow-up?
I would love to be a photographer or artist.
What is your dream job? (If money/practicality does not matter!)
A photographer! I love to take pictures…
Do you know what you want to study in college?
I want to study law or performing arts.
Do you know where you want to go to college?
I’m not sure yet…
What is the biggest misconception you think parents have about teens?
I think parents think all teens are the same…obsessed with sex and thigns like that…but they’re not!
If there is one thing you could tell parents about teens what would it be?
That they’re just like you, just 20 years ago!
What is your favorite website?
I love youtube…it’s the best.

Alexis

Age: 16

Grade: 11

Hometown: Armonk, NY

What do you want to be when you grow-up?
An actress
What is your dream job? (If money/practicality does not matter!)
Being an actress :)
Do you know what you want to study in college?
I want to double major in Drama and English
Do you know where you want to go to college?
Barnard College of Columbia University is my top choice
What is the biggest misconception you think parents have about teens?
That we don’t care. We do, we really do, we just don’t know how to show it all the time.
If there is one thing you could tell parents about teens what would it be?
We want to talk to our parents as much as you want to talk to us, it’s just sometimes easier to go to our friends.
What is your favorite website?
I think Facebook. I know, how stereotypical of me!
Least favorite thing about high school, most favorite thing about high school:
Least Favorite: The stress! Especially during Junior Year
Favorite: Making friends with people of all different ages and theatre

Nate

Age: 16

City: Los Angeles, CA

Favorite Color: Blue

Favorite Food: Chinese

Favorite Place to travel: between the Negev and the Golan (both places in Israel)

Least favorite thing about High School: Homework and Tests.

Most Favorite Thing About High School: All of the technology classes, Tech theater, and my friends.

He also has an awesome blog called Nate Rocks!

Juliette

Juliette is a 15-year-old high school student in North Carolina. She is interested in pursuing a career in writing and in her free time enjoys volleyball, juggling, and photography.

-My name: Juliette
-My Grade: 11
-Home State: North Carolina
-Favorite movie: The Illusionist
-Favorite website: Wikipedia

-Favorite topic to write about: Topics that I have personal experience with or effect my life

Biggest misconception about teens: That we are constantly trying to find ways to go behind our parents back and generally deceive them.

-What you wish all parents knew: Your teen’s behavior is highly guided by your own actions and this can be having either a good or bad effect.

I am in many ways in ordinary teen: going to the movies with friends, going to high school, and of course dealing with my parents. However, I am rather unordinary in that I will be blogging about teenage life in order to help you understand the world your teen lives in. I love to write and I am looking forward to blogging on this site very much. Hopefully, my entries will be as enjoyable for you to read as they were for me to write.

Alia

Alia is a 13 year-old from Nebraska. She loves to play the Acoustic guitar and, wants to be famous musician and a famous actor in Hollywood.

My name is Alia. My home state is Nebraska (Go cornhuskers! lol). I love to play the Acoustic guitar. I am currently in the eigth grade studying concert band as my major and percussion as my minor.

I would have to say my favorite movie of all time is, The Chronicles Of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe. I absolutely love the message in that movie.

Like most teens these days, my favorite website is youtube.

The topic that I like to write about the most is The Everyday Lives Of Teens, from the relationships, to the gossip, to the hurt and pain.

I think the biggest misconception about teens is the thought that, we don’t don’t understand or we don’t care about anyone else but ourselves. Teens have feelings just like everyone else. We might not show it in the best way ever, but we still care about other people. The one thing I wish all parents knew is, that teens not only want them (our parents) to hear us, but to actually listen.

Shannon

My name is Shannon and I am at the ripe old age of sixteen. I have the fantastic privilege of interning for Vanessa Van Petten and I wanted to properly introduce myself by giving you a snapshot of my life and my view of the world.

I currently reside in Maryland, home of the Chesapeake Bay and Washington Wizards. I’ve found that it is a bit dull here when it comes to excitement. I mean, I’d never expect to have one of those “I was just walking down the street and you’ll never guess who I ran into…” stories. But on the upside, we do have exceptionally interesting weather and experience all four of the glorious seasons—spring, summer, winter, and fall.

I attend a private all girls High School. I usually receive a variety of interesting and sometimes peculiar comments about this because a) it is a private, all girls high school, b) it’s a Catholic school and c) the neighborhood where it’s located is a bit sketchy. Some of the more outlandish and humorous ones include: “Have you ever been shot?” “Are there a lot of lesbians at your school?” “Do you really have to wear those uniform shoes every day?”

So anyway, I’ve just finished sophomore year which I find both exciting and scary. Exciting because it means one year closer to freedom and scary because it means…one year closer to freedom. All I ever hear from my friends is that they want to get out of high school, onto college, and start “real life”. But to me real life doesn’t just mean being freed from the rules that my mother enforces. Real life means change. It comes with real responsibility, real decision-making, and the need to really know what you want. If you were to ask which me of those things I find both terrifying and exhilarating I would check the box marked “All of the Above”.

I am a total movie-holic. I don’t have a specific favorite movie because I watch so many so often that it changes all the time. I do, however, have a specific collection of movies that could be considered my favorites because I never get tired of watching them. They are as follows:

The Notebook— I always cry when I watch this movie. It makes me feel hopeful that true love might actually exist.

Pirates of the Caribbean— First of all, the fact that pirates get to do whatever they want is fantastic. Also, the sword fighting and the music during scenes are always in sync. That combined with the humor, action and romance makes for a very entertaining trilogy.

Ocean’s 11/12/13— It completely blows my mind that there are actually people in this world who are smart enough to pull off heists like the ones in these movies.

The Bourne Identity/Supremacy/Ultimatum— These movies always give me chills. To think that it is possible for the government to have that much power and that much control without the public knowing—scary. Plus Matt Damon is a total babe and the character he plays is practically a military robot which I think is super cool.

My favorite website is Facebook. Yes, I know that sounds like a stereotypical teenage cliché, but I can’t help it. The creator of this website is truly a genius. I’m not kidding when I tell you it’s an addiction. Every time I get on the computer my fingers are instantly itching to visit my profile and check out all the latest news and newest scandals. With the push of a button I have immediate access to all the intriguing lives of the people I know and love. Plus, it’s an easy way for me to keep up with my friends who are out of state or off at college. Who could want more than that?

I don’t think I could narrow it down to one topic that is my absolute favorite to write about. I like expressing my opinion about all sorts of things but there are a few that have earned the title of my favorites. They include: sex, true love, alcohol and drugs: condone or condemn?, equality—black vs. white, women vs. men, etc., and my all-time favorite: Nick Jonas. Yes, Nick Jonas. As for as boys go, NickJ is totally boss. My mind wanders to that shy-smiling, piano playing, finger tingling, singer/song writer quite often.

One of the biggest misconceptions about teens is that all teenagers are having or are thinking about having sex. I’m not saying that we don’t think about sex, but a lot of us aren’t actually interested in doing it. Our lives are busy enough! Trying to balance school and sports and clubs and social lives is already difficult. Throwing sex into the mix brings about a whole new list of complications that we literally don’t have time to deal with. Plus, the majority of us either don’t have jobs or don’t have jobs that pay well enough for us to support a kid or to pay for secret STD checkups.

One thing I wish all parents knew is how badly we, as teens, seek their approval. Most of the time we flat our refuse to admit it, but really and truly we just want to satisfy them. And one of the reasons it is so easy for us to pick fights with them is because we feel like we’re busting our butts trying to please them and all they can do is point out our flaws. It’s not that they say, “I think you suck” but small things, like mentioning the C we got on our paper instead of congratulating us on the A we received on our test, really hit us hard.

Samantha

-Grade: 12

-Home State: California

-Favorite movie: Sweet Home Alabama and P.S. I Love You

-Favorite website: TeenVogue.com and Forever21.com

-Favorite topic to write about: Fashion

-Biggest misconception about teens: “Teens don’t know….” I can’t count how many times I have heard the expression “Teens don’t know…” It commonly is said when parents are talking about the teen generation and how teens don’t know how the teen world is. Newsflash: We Are the Teen World. The misconception of our age and how we go about our day in the teen world, and how we should play a part in that world is built up by this image and understanding by adults on how teens should be in society.

-What you wish all parents knew: We don’t mean to make you hurt sometimes, we are immature and are still learning; developing into mature young adults.

-Hello my name is Samantha. I’m a 17-year-old aspiring fashion journalist who lives in the O.C.

Emma

Emma is a high schooler living in North Carolina (yearning to move to NYC.) She wants to be a writer. She believes in fairies.

Name: Emma

Grade: Ninth/Freshman/First year of high school (You get to hear all about my new high school experiences!)

Home state: North Carolina

Favorite movie: I’m currently obsessed with Sweeney Todd, but other favorites are: Titanic, Pride and Prejudice, Phantom of the Opera, Edward Scissorhands, Chicago and What’s Eating Gilbert Grape. (There is a definite trend toward movies with amazing music, Johnny Depp, and Leonardo DiCaprio.)

Favorite website: http://vampirelibrarian.blogspot.com/2006/04/hot-commodity.html

Favorite topic to write about: Lovely little teenage idiosyncrasies. Like the slow up and down look that girls give you as they try and use x-ray vision to read the brand name on the tags/labels of your clothes. (Fortunately I cut the tags out of my clothing. I win!)

Biggest misconception about teens: We say “like” and “um” every other word out of pure spite and hatred of adults. Actually, most teens really wish they could stop this habit, but you try spending seven hours a day with teenagers and not pick up this terrible tic.

What I wish all parents knew: It’s really easy for today’s teens to get into situations way beyond what they can handle. Unfortunately, parents rarely can guess/notice what’s going on in their child’s life (frequently because the issue at hand wasn’t around when they were growing up.) Teens need and want (even if they won’t admit it) an adult to help them.

Sarah

Sarah is a 16 year old girl from Connecticut. She enjoys singing, dancing, and one day would like to be a teen fiction author.

Your Grade: 11

Home State: Connecticut

Favorite movie: Pride & Prejudice

Favorite website: Facebook

Favorite topic to write about: Insight to everyday teen issues

Biggest misconception about teens: All teens are rebellious and are only concerned with superficial things

What you wish all parents knew: If you want us to respect you, respect us

Carina

Carina is a 16 year-old high school student in Grade 11. She is interested in dancing and acting and in her free time enjoys writing stories, or drawing.

-My name: Carina

-My Grade: 11

-Home Province: Ontario

-Favorite movie: The Illusionist or Chicago

-Favorite website: www.shockwave.com

-Favorite topic to write about: Anything about goal setting, or achieving something

-Biggest misconception about teens: We’re smarter and work harder then you think. Sometimes we seem so mischievous but really, we take care in what we are passionate about. Give us a chance and you’ll see.

-What you wish all parents knew: Treat us the way you want to be treated. If you are over-protected or treat us like babies, we will back away and never want to speak to you cause it seems either controlling or degrading. Just treat us like young adults. OH! And just cause you’re yelling at us to do something, doesn’t make us want to do it more. Trust me, that room will be clean when we realize for ourselves a tornado hit it!

Carys

First Name: Carys

Age: Thirteen

City, Country: Arouca, Trinidad

Favorite Color: Pink, Red, Blue.

Favorite Food: Pelau

Favorite Place to travel: California

Least favorite thing about School: The tests.

Most Favorite Thing About School: Homework and Friends.

Favorite Website: quibblo.com

What you wish all parents knew: That if you watch over your children too much, they will rebel against your rules.

Biggest misconception about teens: The mean things they say are not because they mean it, but no one understands them, yet.

Gema

Gema is a new teen writer for us, she is a 17-year old from Miami, FL. She is obsessed with writing and reading young adult fiction and hopes to one day be a published author.

Age: 17

Favorite color: dark red

Favorite food
: spaghetti

Favorite place to travel: Nicaragua

Least favorite thing about high school, most favorite thing about high school:

My least favorite thing about high school would have to be the pressure of SAT’S and other standard tests in order to get into a good college. It makes you feel like a failure if you don’t get an adequate score.. My favorite thing about high school is the experiences, the friends and the memories. Even as you live the moments, you know you’ll remember them forever.

What do you want to be when you grow-up?: At the moment, I want to be a pharmacist. I enjoy chemistry and the thought of helping people. Being a doctor always felt like too much of a morbid job, but pharmacy offers a nugget hope with every medicine.

My dream job would be to be a full time author. I would love to spend the rest of my life writing about the characters in my head and the adventures they go through and the things they learn about human nature.

Do you know what you want to study in college?: Ideally, I would love to take creative writing courses and history. But I’ll be studying pharmacy.

The biggest misconception parents have about teens is that they don’t have any problems. I can’t even count the number of times my own parents have said: “you have nothing to worry about, you’re only [insert age here].” Granted, most of us don’t have to worry about bills and keeping our jobs and all of that, but our little problems are our own, and whether they are big or small, they are still important to us.

If there is one thing you could tell parents about teens what would it be?: I would probably tell parents that not all of us hatch a top secret plan every morning that is designed to drive them into an insane asylum. Teens are humans and prone to make mistakes and some of them are willing to learn from those mistakes.

What is your favorite website? Youtube. I am currently addicted to vlogbrothers.

Becca

Becca is a 16 year-old from West Palm Beach, FL. She loves to cook and travel, and she would like to study International Business in the future.Favorite color: Blue

Least favorite thing about high school, most favorite thing about high school:

Least– Drudge work or anything that wastes my time

Most– The ability to create an image for yourself.

What do you want to be when you grow-up? Something where I can travel. I love going new places and seeing new things and speaking other languages. I speak Hebrew fluently and am in my 5th year of Spanish. I would really like to learn at least one or two more languages.

What is your dream job? International Business of some sort/ Mother

What is the biggest misconception you think parents have about teens? Adults in general think that teenagers are so self-centered that they fail to recognize that there are bigger problems in the world. Although teens may not express this at every given chance, a larger portion of the teenage population than most parents think is, in fact, aware.

If there is one thing you could tell parents about teens what would it be? Extremity on either end of the parenting spectrum is negative in the long run. Parents who are too lax with their kids will not retain the respect that is necessary, but extremely strict parents will end up turning their children away. Also, teens have to learn to make their own choices. You can’t always stop a mistake before it happens, or your child will never learn for him or herself.

What is your favorite website? I don’t think I have one, but the one I use most often is Google, I guess.

For Schools

We have a ton of resources for schools at Radical Parenting. Check out what we have for you below:

1. Virtual School: How Academics have gone Virtual

In this section we have a whole series of articles on school and how it is gone virtual!

2. School Speaker:

Vanessa Van Petten travels the country speaking to schools about family relationships, teen lifestyles, school-life balance and many other issues pertaining to 2nd through 12th grade students. Vanessa has done hundreds of school events in a lively and fun event format. She typically does a rotation of three hours back to back, one for students, one for teachers and one for parents!

Here are her most popular talks for schools:

 

  • Understanding the Net-Generation, Digital Kids in Adult Friendly Terms

This workshop gives a complete overview into what kids and teens 6-18 are doing online and how parents and adults can leverage the Internet’s assets and help their children avoid it’s pitfalls. We also look at social applications, online trends and even slang. Vanessa talks about how technology is affecting all areas of life in new ways–friendship, dating, school and even self-esteem.

  • Teen Secret Communication 101: The Science of Relationships

Have you ever wished you could know when someone was lying to you? In this dynamic presentation, Vanessa Van Petten teaches teens and parents how they can use scientific research to get what they want from their relationships, stop fighting and understand their sometimes frustrating counterparts. Using social and emotional literacy skills, Vanessa provides youth with a new strategy to fight bullying, lying and drama. Vanessa’s unique perspective, hilarious stories and groundbreaking research have stunned and delighted audiences all over the world.

  • Social Literacy: Anti-Clique and Anti-Bullying

This program is unlike any other parent or teen workshop. Ranging from audiences of 12 to 600 Vanessa teaches participants how to use a totally new form of communication to radically change the anger/guilt cycle, clique formation and the decline of teen empathy.

For more info on Vanessa’s speaking for schools, click here.

“My wife and I were so impressed with the topic and your presentation. You are amazingly articulate (no ums, you know, ahhs), on point, concise, poised, with good presence and comedic timing.  And not just for your age – for any public speaker.  You have a career in television.  I can’t believe how polished you are.  You made the time fly.

For the first time, I got the generation gap between my son (16 years-old) and me (46).  All parents know there will be a generation gap.  This is as certain as death and taxes.  But your insight into technology, youths’ need for connectiveness, their “playground”, “friends”, social pressure, and sadly, their collective weakness to interact person-to-person, were mind-blowing.

I have a much better understanding of what taking away a cell phone or computer means to our son when he’s grounded.  It makes some of his behavior (good and bad) more understandable.  (He’s glued to YouTube.)

I was slightly skeptical that a young person like you could provide helpful parenting advice.  In an era when a seven-year-old can give relationship advice (true story), I thought you had to be older and be a parent first.  Boy, was I wrong.  Your insight was gold to us and we will always appreciate your information. We bought your book and look forward to reading it. –John Chavez”

3. School Related Articles:

6 Ways to Multi-Task

It is important to teach middle school students how to multi-task effectively.  We want to make sure students are studying well.

How to be More Efficient

Have you ever sat down yourself or with your child to do homework and it just moves so slowly? This is a problem with efficiency and we consider efficiency an ultimate study skill and give you some easy tips for it.

How to Stop Procrastinating

Middle school students are young enough to learn how to avoid procrastination habits early.  If they learn to use study skills early, their grades will benefit significantly.

Reading Study Skills: How to Memorize As You Read

This is a great skill to practice early.  Many people do not apply study skills to reading, but we think it is a great way to absorb your reading and study as you do homework reading.

5 Tips for Wandering Workers

Do you have a wandering worker? Are you a wandering worker? Find out!

Pros and Cons of Virtual Studying

More and more of school is going online.  Here are some of our favorite free tools.

How to Cure School Burn-Out

Usually middle school students aren’t burned out yet.  But you might want to read this article to prepare for the end of school blues.

Emailing Teachers: 5 Tips to Successfully Email Teachers

As schooling becomes more and more virtual (e-books, online homework, etc) it is important to learn how to develop proper relationships with teachers online as well as in class

Teacher CyberBating: Terrible Teen Classroom Trend Teens are now angering teachers, filming their reaction and then putting it all over YouTube…what can we do?

 

 

 


Clique Workshops for Girls

We have created specialized workshops for self-esteem, friendships and healthy lifestyle planning and prevent against bullying, cliques and risky behaviors.

Vanessa’s Story:

Vanessa Van Petten, teen author of the parenting book “You’re Grounded!,” writes RadicalParenting.com along with 60 teen writers, ages 12-20 to help parents and adults get an honest and open view into the world and mind of youth. Van Petten, now 25, graduated Magna Cum Laude from Emory University in May of 2007, the same month, her book “You’re Grounded!” launched and was named in the “Top 5 Hottest Books” on Amazon it’s first month.

•Her site contains thousands of articles, videos, screencasts and live chats with Van Petten, teen writers and trendsetters from 34 different coutnries to offer parents a win- dow into the daily lives of their teen and tween kids. She shows parents how to talk with their screen-obsessed net generation children about everything: including safely using Facebook, smoking pot, High School dances, oral sex, and gives them tips from actual teens.

•Van Petten is now on an international speaking tour and was chosen as one of the top 100 Bloggers to watch by Women’s Magazine.

•Radicalparenting.com is read by thousands of teens and parents daily. In January 2009 she spoke at the Consumer Electronics Show at the session “Teens and Social Networking.”

•She was featured on CNN, CBS 4 Miami and Fox 5 New York and has been in the Wall Street Journal, Teen Vogue, MSN Money, Good Housekeeping Online, Atlanta Insite Magazine and the World Journal. She has been an expert on Playboy Radio, KBUR, WCOJ Philadelphia and more for giving a young perspective on awesome parenting.

Vanessa’s Mission Statement: To improve parent-teen relationships by providing them with new perspectives, stories and neutral places to communicate. This will help families build strong relationships that promote healthy attitudes and lifestyle behaviors in this generation of young adults.

What Makes Vanessa Different: One of the reasons so many communities have brought Vanessa to speak is because she is young enough to know where teens are coming from and have them open up to her and she is old enough to respect and translate for parents. She also interacts with thousands of teens on a weekly basis, her research studies, one-on-one work and position in the media give her a platform to understand youth in a very different way.

Radical Approach: Vanessa teaches, applies and is currently doing research on the principles of Dr. Paul Ekman on human lie detecting and emotional reading. She often teaches audiences–both teens and parents, how to read facial microexpressions, be a human lie detector and excel at social literacy to be able to read who they are communicating with. Vanessa has found this essential to her help for teens and parents. Parents learn to better understand their teenager and kids grasp the importance of social literacy to prevent bullying, cliques and miscommunication with their parents. This makes for lively and unique presentations.

See our media page for clips, reviews and testimonials. Also see Vanessa’s Consulting.

  • Social Literacy: Anti-Clique, Argument Prevention and How to be a Human Lie Detector

This program is unlike any other parent or teen workshop. Ranging from audiences of 12 to 600 Vanessa teaches participants how to use a totally new form of communication to radically change the anger/guilt cycle, clique formation and the decline of teen empathy.

Girl Workshops

Vanessa uses very unique techniques to connect with and teach girls about self-care, bully prevention, cliques, jealousy and drama. To get more details on her approach, feel free to contact us.

-Dating (Choices, break-ups, safe sex)

-Friendship Challenges, the mean-girl syndrome, growing apart, betrayal, conflicts, competition and cliques.

-Academic and School pressures

-Career planning, resume building and confusing feelings about direction in life.

-Challenging family relationships

-Decision Making

-Negative self-esteem, confidence, self-destructive behavior and overall self-acceptance

Also see our Teen Speaker’s Bureau

Testimonial:

“My wife and I were so impressed with the topic and your presentation.

You are amazingly articulate (no ums, you know, ahhs), on point, concise, poised, with good presence and comedic timing. And not just for your age – for any public speaker. You have a career in television. I can’t believe how polished you are. You made the time fly.

For the first time, I got the generation gap between my son (16 years-old) and me (46). All parents know there will be a generation gap. This is as certain as death and taxes. But your insight into technology, youths’ need for connectiveness, their “playground”, “friends”, social pressure, and sadly, their collective weakness to interact person-to-person, were mind-blowing.

I have a much better understanding of what taking away a cell phone or computer means to our son when he’s grounded. It makes some of his behavior (good and bad) more understandable. (He’s glued to YouTube.)

I was slightly skeptical that a young person like you could provide helpful parenting advice. In an era when a seven-year-old can give relationship advice (true story), I thought you had to be older and be a parent first. Boy, was I wrong. Your insight was gold to us and we will always appreciate your information.

We bought your book and look forward to reading it.
John Chavez”

See more testimonials here.

We’re On CNN!

We have done a lot of work for CNN. Vanessa now writes a column for CNN. Please take a look at some recent ones:

Nonversations: When talking to your teen is one-sided

Perfectionist parents and their always-lacking kids

Why Are So Many Teens Sexting? with Dr Drew

Also check out some of our previous video appearances on CNN:

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kIYpfQkSLjU&feature=player_embedded[/youtube]

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YGZUhLMUhYI[/youtube]

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EyxVcSQHUrM[/youtube]

Screen shot 2009-09-11 at 12.03.17 PM

     

  • See Vanessa on Jen and Barb’s MomLife:
  • Our iPhone app was featured on TechCrunch and the Washington Post!

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mg3Ri30U0xY[/youtube]

  • CBS 4 3/24/2008, “Understanding the Net-Generation” Click to Play:

cbs

[vimeo]http://vimeo.com/7955375[/vimeo]

  • Wall Street Journal
  • Santa Monica Daily Press (article below)

  • World Journal (article below)
  • Atlanta Insite Magazine (article below)
  • Greg Mantell Show, 3/15/2008
  • Los Angeles Times
  • Playboy Radio, 12/10/2007 with TIFFANY GRANATH

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wvnxAkTCtsc[/youtube]

See excerpts, clips and soundbites below.

Recent Press and Activity

Previous Media Appearances:

Vanessa has also been interviewed for a number of parenting podcasts and e-radio shows, here her on Sexy Mom Show by clicking here: Alana Pratt Interview.mp3

3/12/2008 Cocktail Hour with Adrienne Soresi

3/19/2008 AM 650 KGAB Philadelphia Radio 1490. Listen Here.

3/26/2008 WCOJ interview, 6:30am (PST)

3/31/2008 Foz and Tina Show! z107, 8:30am (EST)

4/2/2008 Young Turks Show

4/9/2008 Fox 5 New York

4/9/2008 CFRB Radio

4/11/2008 Watts Radio KXYL, Texas, 3:15pm PT

4/15/2008 WOCM-FM 98.1 Bulldog and The Rude Awakening Show

4/29/2008 TWIT TV Jumping Monkeys with Megan Morrone and Leo Laporte

08/08/08 Check out my interview with Andrew Robinson !

09/09/08 Interview I did at Creating Gen Y Magic

06/18/08 I was on: Parenting My Teen Podcast

05/10/08 Podcast Interview: Stressed Out and Overwhelmed: How to deal with Senioritis and School Burn-Out

06/17/08 Did a recording with Aurelia at Parenting My Teen Podcast on my post on “How to Be A Parental Sounding Board”

10/20/08 Hear me on the Kiva Spirit Podcast !

09/10/08 I was listed on AllTop.com recently, they have a great list of the top parenting blogs !

08/31/08 Talked Today on the Vic Mccarty Show about how teens are handling Sarah Palin’s daughter’s pregnancy

10/22/08 Nice post about us on TravelMuse.

07/28/08 Check out my interview on Y-Talk Radio with Bea Fields on Drugs, Alcohol and Teens (a little oral sex thrown in there too).

08/04/08 I was on Dr Matt Gomes Podcast, give it a listen!

Vanessa Van Petten In The Press

Press Clips Reproduced Below

VisionXY: October 23, 2007

Leadership Highlight

For the past six months, I have been creating a database of the top 100 leaders in America between the ages of 18-35 years of age that I believe are leading effectively and making a positive impact in their family, community, nation, or world.

One of the leaders that I recently had the opportunity to meet through a producer friend of mine was a young woman by the name of Vanessa Van Petten. Vanessa is a recent graduate from Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia who is a motivational speaker that has written a book entitled, “You’re Grounded”, and has created an interactive website entitled, “RRules.com” that has been designed to help parents and teens better communicate with one another.

Aside from being a wonderful person and gift to society, one of the three main reasons that I wanted to feature Vanessa in this month’s newsletter is because she’s a great example of young people graduating from college and beginning to make a difference right away, she is also addressing an issue within our society and culture that desperately needs to be addressed, and she is tackling issues that are probably solutions to the many high school and college shootings that we have seen over the past year.

If you would like more information about Vanessa, you can visit her blog at http://vanessavanpetten.com/ to get more information about her, and for more information about her interactive website, you can visit that website at rrules.com.

From the Jewish Review:

Book starts parent-teen conversations

By Deborah Moon

As a high school senior, Vanessa Van Petten wrote a book designed to get parents and teenagers talking. Her 2007 graduation from Emory University coincided with the book’s publication. Now Van Petten is working with teens and parents around the country through seminars and lectures. She will be in Portland Oct. 8 and 9 to talk to parents one night and teens the next.

Starting with a chapter on how the physiological differences between the adolescent and adult brain create miscommunication, the book quickly moves on to practical advice—both for teens and their parents.

It was interesting to read that family meetings so highly touted in books by adults are not viewed as productive by most teens.

One piece of information I found useful was her statement on helping teens avoid burnout: “If you do not help your kids find a good balance between homework, going out and family time early in their teenage years, your kids will find it by experimenting themselves. This leads to rebellion.”

Some ideas are common sense. For instance, a teen will respond better to rules if you give them a reason. “‘Just because’ reasons for your decisions make teens resentful and angry.”

In her chapter on drugs and alcohol, Van Petten describes “the teenage drug culture EVERY teenager is in whether they do drugs or not.”

Van Petten recommends: “Do not be too authoritative when having the drug talk. … Have a discussion, not a lecture.”

I was intrigued by the teenage perspective on concrete tips for intergenerational communication, so I asked my teenage son to read the book too.

He thought the book had some good advice and that the section on the pressures today’s teens face was essential reading for parents. But some of the suggestions—such as ideas for positive reinforcement—reminded him too much of the way he works with preschoolers. And he said the suggestion to find activities of common interests for teens and parents to share, seemed pointless. He said even if an activity was appealing to both, teens aren’t likely to want to do it with their parents.

I guess the book succeeded—We’re talking.

“You’re Grounded! How to stop fighting and make the teenage years easier. A teenage perspective,” by Vanessa Van Petten, 2007, iUniverse, Lincoln, Neb., $13.95, 119 pages.

Featured in the Wall Street Journal
Away, Away and Up
On Campus, and Studying Abroad, With Vanessa Van Petten
By CAITLIN J. NORIS

Special to The Wall Street Journal Classroom Edition

On her 21st birthday, Vanessa Van Petten spent time with her friends and sipped chilled champagne. The happy celebration was interrupted only by freezing wind gusts, the sound of yaks grunting and chest pains caused by breathing oxygen-thin air at 20,000 feet above sea level.
Not a typical birthday celebration for a college student, but then, this wasn’t just another day on campus. Vanessa was on the second leg of a junior-year study-abroad program that took her to Australia, China and, eventually, Camp 1 of Mount Everest in Tibet.

“I’m not a hiker. I’m not a climber. I’m athletic and I run, but I’m not a huge camper,” says Vanessa. “It scared me, but it was the ultimate challenge. It seemed like I could do anything if I could climb Mount Everest.”

Vanessa’s journey began 7,000 miles away and two years earlier on the campus of Emory University, where she enrolled in a beginner’s Chinese language course. “Chinese was the second class I walked into as a freshman,” she remembers. “I couldn’t even say hello in Chinese.” Eventually, though, she became confident enough to choose Chinese and international studies as her majors. “I not only fell in love with the language,” she says, “but I really started to like the culture, because it was so different from my own.”

Hip-Hop Thesis
When the Chinese department approached Vanessa about writing an honors thesis, she chose an unusual topic: Chinese underground hip-hop. To conduct her research, she first traveled to Sydney, Australia, during the first semester of her junior year at Emory to take Asian-studies courses and meet with English-speaking Chinese researchers. Then, she traveled to China in the spring for research and additional coursework at a university in Shanghai.

There, she found an academic environment very different from the one she knew in Atlanta. A typical Chinese dorm might have eight people in one room. And the students are “all about school,” she says. “The universities are so competitive to get into because there aren’t that many universities and they are all state-run.” Since school is so important, Chinese students party a lot less than Americans, she says. Another major difference she found is that Chinese students don’t get to choose a major. “Kids take two examinations in high school: The first examination is to get into college, and the second examination tells them what their major will be.”

With much greater freedom to explore, Vanessa took classes such as Asian Film and Fiction, Basic Chinese History, and Indian Philosophy, which were taught in English. “Classes are really important because they give you a structure to your day,” says Vanessa. “But in China, I learned more walking to class on the street than I did in the classroom.”

After class, she went club-hopping to research the Chinese hip-hop scene for her thesis. “Trying to get in with the Chinese gangsters to interview them about my thesis was one of the most interesting experiences,” she says. “When I say ‘gangsters,’ I mean totally fake gangsters,” she adds with a laugh. Vanessa says the Chinese rappers’ lyrics are open and raw but very different from rap lyrics in America. She discovered that underground Chinese rap is often about love, admiration of hip-hop as a musical form, and dealing with the monotony in everyday life; however, she adds that Chinese hip-hop sounds just like ours. “They even steal some of Jay-Z’s beats and rap in Chinese with their own lyrics,” she explains.
Vanessa describes study abroad as a life-changing experience that gave her a global perspective. “There are a lot of orphans there who don’t have enough to eat,” she says, “I’m very thankful for the things I have now.” She says she experienced a “reverse culture shock” upon returning to see the excesses of American life.

Vanessa says she also was surprised to experience discrimination when she was abroad. Chinese shopkeepers would often overcharge her, assuming that she was rich because of her nationality and race. “It made me realize how people see us and it changed my view of myself,” she says.
Rough Terrain

But Vanessa points to her Mount Everest trek as the moment she knew study abroad had changed her. She almost didn’t go because she was scared of altitude sickness or falling during the hike. Conquering the mountain-and her fears-involved a long plane flight to Tibet, four days traveling over rough terrain in an SUV, and a treacherous climb up the freezing mountain. The best part, she says, was coming down off the mountain and feeling a strong sense of accomplishment. “I did it, even though everything was stopping me.”

Vanessa recommends that students interested in going abroad get their mandatory coursework out of the way early on, so they can fit in a semester or two of study abroad and still graduate on time. They should also start researching scholarships and saving money months ahead of time, as a study abroad can involve higher costs than staying on campus. The college study abroad office offers information on countries, programs and possible side expeditions, and advice from upperclassmen who have returned from abroad can help you determine which programs are worthwhile.
Studying abroad is a tough step for many students, because of the prospect of stepping into an alien culture all alone, without family or friends from home. But Vanessa says that only enhances the learning experience. “I feel like when people go abroad with a safety net, they don’t venture out and try to meet new people or talk to other foreign students,” she says. Other students considering study abroad fear missing a semester’s worth of memories at their home campus. “You do miss out by studying abroad,” she says. “It’s a lie if people tell you that you don’t. Life goes on without you.”

But, she adds, “you come back with so many new experiences that you’ve moved on way further than a lot of people who stayed at normal college. You grow as a person.

Interested in Having Us Post About or Review Your Product/Blog/Service?

Whether you are an author, fellow blogger or company, check out how to do that here.

Family Activity Workbook

We are very excited to announce that Radical Parenting has a new book! It is a family workbook. We are always asking our readers what they need from us and one thing that kept coming up was the need for a more interactive book for families. Parents are constantly looking for ways to bond with their teenagers and lessen age gaps between kids.

So…the Radical Parenting teens and I put together a workbook with 30 days (or weeks or months) worth of activities for families with kids of all ages!

BUY The Radical Workbook on AMAZON

The Radical Family Workbook and Activity Journal is for Parents, Kids and Teens

20 of my interns wrote it with me to give parents real advice and bonding activities that will actually work! In this series, we put together 30 sessions worth of challenges and activities to help your family re-start, re-energize and re-connect.

In each session, families will get a set of challenges, materials and action steps to do for about 30 minutes. Families can work through the Radical Family Workbook at their own pace! You could do a session every day or one every three months!

This is for families with children of all ages. Younger children can even participate in many of the activities and family bonding times.

BUY The Radical Workbook on AMAZON

What’s Inside:

Each lesson has activities, journal prompts and bonding ideas for kids. Here is a sneak peak at some of the lessons:

Family Goals

We work a lot with you on making great personal goals and individual goals.

How Well Do You Know Each Other?

This section has questionnaires and games for you to test each other on how well you know your family.

Clean-Outs

Start fresh with our step by step guide for re-seting some of the areas of your home.

The Family Challenge

We are going to help you come up with the ultimate family challenge with our activity list and idea maker. This will be fun and challenging.

Time Capsule

Build a time capsule with your family as a bonding activity and to save memories.

Gratitude

Learn how to be grateful and remind your children being thankful for what we have been given is an essential part of growing up and bonding with each other.

Dreamlining

Dreamlining is a way of brainstorming and thinking about what you are passionate about, what you love to do and dreaming big. You are going to help each other think of what you desire most in life and how to achieve it. Dreamlining is really the process of thinking of ideals, goals and desires.

Family Memory Project

One of the things that our teens emphasized was the importance of family history and keeping memories together.

Online Safety Session

We have a whole session on Internet Smarts and online safety for kids and teens of all ages.

BUY The Radical Workbook on AMAZON

Drugs, Alcohol and Teens

I will be constantly writing articles about news updates with Drugs, Alcohol, Partying and Teens and will be posting the articles in the series to this page:

How to Make Sure Teens Party Sober Partying is huge right now! How can parents make sure that teens party sober? Here are some tips for how to talk to your kids and encourage them to stay clean and safe.

10 Reasons Parents Should Not Support Legalizing Marijuana Here I list all of the reasons parents should be against marijuana.

10 Reasons Parents Should Encourage Legalizing Marijuana Here I list all of the reasons parents should be supportive of marijuana.

Teen Drunk Dialing and Emailing I think is actually a rather serious issue and parents should be aware of it.

Teaching Your Teen How to Drink Oh boy, this one was controversial. Here are some ways that teens can deal with alcohol at parties including taking fake shots, losing your drink and feeding the plants, tell me what you think!

Teen Alcohol Trend: Teen Eye Shot How teens are actually pouring alcohol in their eyes to get drunk faster and without vomiting.

11 Strategies: If Your Teen is Smoking Pot Have you found evidence of pot in your kid’s room? Are his friends smoking? Here are 11 ideas and tactics toapproach your teen.

Pot vs Alcohol: What Are Teens Using? Parents need to be aware of the effects and warning signs of both alcohol and marijuana, but what are teens today really using…and how could it effect your family?

[Video] Peer Pressure to Smoke Marijuana Teens smoke marijuana to test their own limits…as well as their friends.

FAQ Teen Pot Smoking Culture: What Parents Should Know Pot smokers etiquette, how prevalent is it today, is it a gateway drug…all of these questions answered and more.

Remembering Heath Ledger: Lessons For Teens How do you explain accidental prescription drug overdose to teens who adored Heath? Take this opportunity to talk to your kids about this growing prescription drug use trend.

Warning Signs Your Teen is Doing Pot Every parent should hope for the best, but know how to recognize the worst. Here are a few pot words defined and some of the warning signs.

Teens Dealing Clean Urine For Money We have all heard of teens dealing pot, but how about clean urine along with that dime bag? Many teens are making a lucrative business selling younger siblings urine from under-the-bed coolers.

Why Do Teens Drink? I include a survey and some statistics that I think many parents would find extremely interesting about why teens like–and worry about when it comes to underage drinking.

How to Protect Your Teens on Spring Break Horrifying videos from MomLogic on their expose of Spring Break. I also give a few tips to avoid the typical tricks teens use when going on Spring Break and how parents can keep their kids safe

Programs for Teens

Teen Intern Program:

If you want to be a Teen Intern: Writer, Trendspotter or Marketer, click here.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XpNazuhO10c[/youtube]

Kids are tired of being lectured by their parents and parents are desperately trying to connect and support their kids…but don’t really know what is going on with them or how to reach them. Radical Teenagers is run by actual teens and 20-somethings.

Our Mission:

-Use our experiences to help parents truly understand and learn how to inspire their kids.
-Mentor, not lecture, teens and tweens on their level. Inspire them, give them the right tools so they can be happier and healthier adults.

Our Principles:

1) High self esteem is our number one priority, everything we do and teach helps parents and teenagers feel good about themselves and what they do.

2) We believe that despite the lows and highs of a parent-child relationship, you can be close with each other. We strive, in very unique ways, to bring families closer, stop bad patterns and build strong, stable relationships.

3) We do not believe in one blanket answer, perfect formulas or traditional parenting ‘self-help’ methods. We use a highly successful and unique format, and then work hard to personalize each one to figure out the answer that is exactly right for you or your child.

What Makes us Different:

Young: We are young, we think this gives us an essential edge to push for radical change in your family.

Relatable: Kids can relate to us and therefore will listen. Parents, by hearing from a mentor close to the age of their child, can get better insight, tools and advice that is really relevant to their lives.

Challenging: Maintaining closeness and harmony in your family and within yourself is a constant challenge and takes work. We do not pretend to have easy fixes, but offer complete support while pushing you and your family to grow and challenge yourself to see awesome results.

Unique: We have very unique principles and teaching methods that are highly personalized.

All-Around-Support: We are one of the few companies that supports all sides of the parenting equation. We have seminars, programs and mentors for parents, teachers, teens, tweens and kids.
Exclusive: We know this program is not for everyone. We maintain a high price point and only accept certain families into our programs to make sure that you are just as committed to your change as we are.

Be sure to leave your comments below if you would like.

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How to Communicate with Teens 101

Learn how to communicate effectively with teens and tweens with tips and advice from actual young people! Here Vanessa and her teen writers share insight and stories to help adults and parents relate.

We know that communicating with your kids is tough.

When I sat down to write an ebook with our teen writers we through over 100 topics on the table. We kept coming back to the most fundamental idea: communication.

If you have good communication, drugs are not a problem. If you have good communication, lying is not a problem. If you have good communication, self-esteem is not a problem.

We kept coming back to this idea over and over again. So, we thought, that is what our first group ebook should be about.

To get your free copy of How to Communicate with Teens and Tweens 101, just sign up here!

Topics Covered:

*Parental sounding board

*How to convey worry tp teens and tweens

*How to convey love to teens and tweens

*The parenting love languages

*Getting teens and tweens to listen

*Getting teens and tweens to talk

*Kid’s Non-verbal communication

*Working as a parental team

*Communicating with teens about friends

*Teen Communication pitfalls

*Communication in family arguments with kids

*Lying Children: What to do when kids lie

*The 5 types of kid liars

*Communicating without Depowerizing

*The Kid Texting Guide

*Communicating with teens and tweens using technology

*Communicating with kids on the phone

*Teen and tween conversation starters

*Activity ideas to communicate with teens

*Communicating to youth about the Internet

*Communicating at family meetings with teens and tweens

*Communicating through teachable moments

To get your free copy of How to Communicate with Teens and Tweens 101, just sign up here!